Tag Archive for Tag: 南京桑拿

Tag: 南京桑拿 Benitez hopes Shelvey is ready for Arsenal

first_img0Shares0000Newcastle are down in 18th position after the first four games of the season, and are still in search of their first win.LONDON, United Kingdom, Sep 13 – Newcastle United manager Rafa Benitez says he is optimistic about having Jonjo Shelvey fit for Saturday’s Premier League clash with Arsenal.The Magpies boss is awaiting late fitness tests for both Shelvey and Matt Ritchie. Shelvey has returned to training after recovering from a thigh injury, while Ritchie is still on his way back from a knee injury. “We have had Jonjo training, and Ritchie’s still with the physio, but they’re pushing,” Benitez told the press.“These two players are the kind of players that you have to stop them, because they want to play and they’re working really, really hard to be there.“So, we will see. Still, we have some time, but at least Jonjo was training. If we don’t have any problems, he can be there. It’s too soon to say ‘yes’, but I am quite optimistic.”Newcastle are down in 18th position after the first four games of the season, and are still in search of their first win.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Tag: 南京桑拿 LYIT STUDENTS RAISE €1,664 AT CHRISTMAS FAIR

first_imgChristine Farren, Mary Healy and Louise Mulvaney pictured at the LyIT Christmas Fair which is run each year to support student families at Christmas time, the Fair in the past has raised substantial funds for students. This year’s offerings include Christmas Wreaths, Yule-time logs, Candy Cane baskets, jewellry box sets.. the perfect stocking fillers. (photo by Paddy Gallagher)The LYIT Student Union annual Christmas Fair took place on Tuesday 3 December, 2013. The idea of the Fair was specifically to raise funds for under privileged student families, many with young children, who are struggling to cover the cost of Christmas.John McClean pictured at the LyIT Christmas Fair where he hopes to sell some Yule Tide logs and Cristmas Wreaths. The proceedsof the Fair at LyIT will go towards assisting the families of students at Christmas time.The Fair played host to many regular fair exhibitors, who sold various treats and creations, which ranged from hats and scarves, to honey, apple jelly, chutneys and greeting cards, gift labels, jewellery and fashion accessories. A modest €1 student admission (€2 staff/outside public), was the entry, which entitled all those who attended to be included in a free draw.€1,664 was raised and this fund will be made available to those most in need by the Chaplaincy Office, at LYIT. Aoife McDonnell, Cara House, Market Square, Letterkenny pictured at the LyIT Christmas Fair with handmade knitwear and hand made baby clothing among the many items on display at the Cara House display stand. The Fair is organised by the Student Union in LyIt and will support student families who are in need at Christmas. (photo by Paddy Gallagher).LYIT STUDENTS RAISE €1,664 AT CHRISTMAS FAIR was last modified: December 11th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:LYIT CHRISTMAS FAIRlast_img read more

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Tag: 南京桑拿 Humboldt State football suffers first loss of the season against No. 13 Central Washington

first_imgEllensburg, Wash. >> When it isn’t your day, it just isn’t your day.The Humboldt State football team certainly found that out in the Pacific Northwest on Saturday afternoon.The showdown between the Great Northwest Athletic Conference’s two unbeatens was won handily by No. 13-ranked Central Washington, as the Wildcats started strong and never let up in a 55-27 win over No. 17 Humboldt State at a sold out Tomlinson Stadium.“We got outplayed plain and simple,” Humboldt State head coach Rob …last_img read more

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Tag: 南京桑拿 Late planting leads to wetter harvested grain

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest More Ohio farmers invested extra time and fuel this year to dry their harvested corn and soybeans because both grains were planted several weeks late and had less time to dry in the field.While drying harvested corn in a mechanical dryer is typical each year, some producers in the state dried soybeans this year for the first time ever.“Soybeans dry a whole lot better outside when it’s 70 degrees and you can run around in short sleeves. Farmers are harvesting in winter coats,” said Eric Richer, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Fulton County, on the far northwestern border of the state. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).If grain stays in a dryer too long, fires can occur. Also, the longer that corn and soybeans sit in drying units, the greater chance the grains will turn brittle, crack, or break down into dust particles — all of which can decrease the price a grower gets for the grain.The grain-drying process comes with risks every year, “but they’re worse when you have wetter grain than normal because the grain has to spend more time in the dryer,” said Jason Hartschuh, an OSU Extension educator in Crawford County, just west of Mansfield.When Ohio corn is harvested, it typically contains about 20% moisture, but this year some grain has 35% to 40% moisture — nearly double the typical level, Hartschuh said. “That’s why we have concerns this year,” he said.Across the state, corn is 90% harvested and soybeans are 95% harvested, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report issued Dec. 2. Both are slightly behind the average harvesting pace over the last five years — corn by 5% and soybeans by 4%.The delay in harvest comes after a delay in spring planting. Growers in western and northwestern Ohio had the greatest delays in planting — having to sow seed about a month later than usual because of unprecedented rain levels last spring. As a result of planting delays, both crops matured later into the fall when there was less daylight and heat to dry them.Even during years when planting is on time, corn typically needs to be dried with a mechanical dryer to ensure it contains only 15% moisture. But soybeans have a shorter growing season and typically completely dry in fields.“I’m hearing of guys drying soybeans with a dryer for the first time in their careers,” Richer said.If grain is not sufficiently dry before it is stored in a bin, the grain could develop mold. And if the grain is overdried and breaks up into fine dust, that dust can form a crust in the grain bin. That crust can block the flow of air throughout the bin, causing the grain to cool improperly, Hartschuh said. That’s when clogs in the grain bin can occur, stopping the flow of grain out of the bin.Given the wetter grain this year, Hartschuh recommended that farmers take the following precautions:Sell the wettest grain first.Set the mechanical dryer to below 200 degrees Fahrenheit for corn, to reduce the chances of grain cracking or breaking down. For soybeans, set it at 130 to 140 degrees.Cool grain to below 40 degrees for winter storage.After filling up a grain bin, remove a few loads of the grain in the middle of the bin, a process called “coring.” That will increase the airflow throughout the bin.Inspect grain every two weeks using a probe to check the temperature. Also, check for insects.For more information on drying grain, visit go.osu.edu/corndrying.last_img read more

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Tag: 南京桑拿 10 months agoBrighton defender Dunk: Hughton up with the best

first_imgBrighton defender Dunk: Hughton up with the bestby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBrighton defender Lewis Dunk says manager Chris Hughton is among the best in the country.Dunk praised Hughton’s management style and explained the ways in which he has helped him to improve since arriving on the south coast in 2014.He said, “I’ve had a few managers at this club, and he’s definitely up there with the best I’ve had in my career.“It’s massive to have him at the club. He’s been massive for my development, I think I’ve come on leaps and bounds since he’s been in charge. I’ve become more and more consistent and he’s calmed me down as a player.“A few years ago I was getting a lot of bookings and I’ve calmed down recently. That’s probably down to talking to and learning off him, because he was a defender too.“He’s taken this club to the next level after it had had been trying to reach the Premier League for a long time. For him to actually do it is a great achievement for the club and the whole city. It’s a massive credit to him.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Tag: 南京桑拿 Twolock box delivers cancer therapy

first_imghttp://news.rice.edu/files/2014/05/0512_AAV-2-web.jpgModified adeno-associated viruses developed at Rice University are “locked” by peptides that respond to the presence of two proteases likely to be overexpressed at the site of cancerous or other diseased tissues. The proteases chew off the peptides, thereby unlocking the virus and allowing it to deliver its therapeutic cargo. (Credit: Junghae Suh/Rice University) AddThis http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/05/0512_AAV-3.jpgJunghae Suh (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,920 undergraduates and 2,567 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6.3-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go here. ShareDavid [email protected] [email protected] box delivers cancer therapyRice University researchers find new possibilities for benign, ‘tunable’ virus HOUSTON – (May 6, 2014) – Rice University scientists have designed a tunable virus that works like a safe deposit box. It takes two keys to open it and release its therapeutic cargo.The Rice lab of bioengineer Junghae Suh has developed an adeno-associated virus (AAV) that unlocks only in the presence of two selected proteases, enzymes that cut up other proteins for disposal. Because certain proteases are elevated at tumor sites, the viruses can be designed to target and destroy the cancer cells.The work appears online this week in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.AAVs are fairly benign and have become the object of intense study as delivery vehicles for gene therapies. Researchers often try to target AAVs to cellular receptors that may be slightly overexpressed on diseased cells.The Rice lab takes a different approach. “We were looking for other types of biomarkers beyond cellular receptors present at disease sites,” Suh said. “In breast cancer, for example, it’s known the tumor cells oversecrete extracellular proteases, but perhaps more important are the infiltrating immune cells that migrate into the tumor microenvironment and start dumping out a whole bunch of proteases as well.“So that’s what we’re going after to do targeted delivery. Our basic idea is to create viruses that, in the locked configuration, can’t do anything. They’re inert,” she said. When programmed AAVs encounter the right protease keys at sites of disease, “these viruses unlock, bind to the cells and deliver payloads that will either kill the cells for cancer therapy or deliver genes that can fix them for other disease applications.”Suh’s lab genetically inserts peptides into the self-assembling AAVs to lock the capsids, the hard shells that protect genes contained within. The target proteases recognize the peptides “and chew off the locks,” effectively unlocking the virus and allowing it to bind to the diseased cells.“If we were just looking for one protease, it might be at the cancer site, but it could also be somewhere else in your body where you have inflammation. This could lead to undesirable side effects,” she said. “By requiring two different proteases – let’s say protease A and protease B – to open the locked virus, we may achieve higher delivery specificity since the chance of having both proteases elevated at a site becomes smaller.”In the future, molecular-imaging approaches will be used to detect both the identity and concentration of elevated proteases. “With that information, we would be able to pick a virus device from our panel of engineered variants that has the right properties to target that disease site. That’s where we want to go,” she said.Suh said elevated proteases are found around many diseased tissues. She suggested these protease-activatable viruses may be useful for the treatment of not only cancers but also neurological diseases, such as stroke, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, and heart diseases, including myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure.The ultimate vision of this technology is to design viruses that can carry out a combination of steps for targeting. “To increase the specificity of virus unlocking, you can imagine creating viruses that require many more keys to open,” she said. “For example, you may need both proteases A and B as well as a cellular receptor to unlock the virus. The work reported here is a good first step toward this goal.”Co-authors are Rice alumni Justin Judd and Abhinav Tiwari; graduate students Michelle Ho, Eric Gomez and Christopher Dempsey; Oleg Igoshin, an associate professor of bioengineering; and Jonathan Silberg, an associate professor of biochemistry and cell biology, all at Rice; and Kim Van Vliet, an assistant research scientist, and Mavis Agbandje-McKenna, a professor, both at the University of Florida. Suh is an assistant professor of bioengineering.The National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas supported the research.-30-Read the abstract at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn500550qFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNewsRelated Materials:Laboratory for Nanotherapeutics Research (Suh): http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~js8/Rice Department of Bioengineering: http://bioe.rice.eduImages for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/05/0512_AAV-1-web.jpgAn adeno-associated virus capsid (blue) modified by peptides (red) inserted to lock the virus is the result of research at Rice University into a new way to target cancerous and other diseased cells. The peptides are keyed to proteases overexpressed at the site of diseased tissues; they unlock the capsid and allow it to deliver its therapeutic cargo. (Credit: Junghae Suh/Rice University)last_img read more

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Tag: 南京桑拿 Oracles bigmoney case against Google gets new life

© 2018 AFP An appeals court on Tuesday gave Oracle another shot at wringing billions of dollars from Google in a keenly watched legal battle over the use of freely available Java software code. Citation: Oracle’s big-money case against Google gets new life (2018, March 27) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-oracle-big-money-case-google-life.html In a big Silicon Valley trial, Oracle argued that Google improperly used Java software to develop the Android mobile operating system This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “This type of ruling will make apps and online services more expensive for users. We are considering our options.”‘Devastating effects’The case dates back to 2012, and Google prevailed at an initial trial.Oracle appealed, and an appellate panel ruled in 2014 that the lower court had erred, sending the case between the two Silicon Valley titans back for a new trial at which Google again triumphed.Silicon Valley watched the case closely, since weaving open source code into software programs is commonplace and often eliminates a need to reinvent commands considered fundamental.APIs are seen as snippets of code that simply direct one program to another, almost the way a restaurant menu points diners to meal options.Public Knowledge policy counsel Meredith Rose lambasted the appellate court, saying it has erred in ruling twice against Google in this case.”Taken together, these decisions—which run counter to decades of software industry practice—could have devastating effects on the competitiveness, openness, and development of the technology industry,” the nonprofit public interest group counsel said in a release.”This could lead to higher prices, fewer choices, and worse products for consumers.” Google wins in retrial of Oracle copyright lawsuit Explore further Oracle’s copyright infringement lawsuit against tech rival Google got fresh life with a federal appeals court ruling A federal appellate court revived Oracle’s case, ruling that the application programming interface (API) code at issue is protected by copyright law and sending the case back to the original judge to figure out how much Google owes the business software titan.A trial two years ago ended with a jury deciding that Google did not unfairly use Java code, saving the internet giant from a possible multibillion-dollar verdict.The appellate court on Tuesday disagreed, saying the software is entitled to copyright protection.Oracle, a major business software and cloud firm, sought billions in damages from Google over the search engine company’s use of Java programming language in its Android smartphone operating system.But Google and its allies argued that extending copyright protection to bits of code, called application programming interfaces, or APIs, would threaten innovation.The case was closely watched by the tech industry because of its implications for software innovation and copyright law.Google, at the time, said that its victory at trial was “a win for the Android ecosystem; for the Java programming community and for software developers who rely on open and free programming languages to build innovative consumer products.”Oracle, which obtained Java when it acquired Sun Microsystems in 2009, had been seeking some $9 billion in damages.Dorian Daley, Oracle’s general counsel, welcomed the latest decision, saying it “upholds fundamental principles of copyright law and makes clear that Google violated the law.”She added in a statement, “This decision protects creators and consumers from the unlawful abuse of their rights.” Google said it was reviewing its options, which could include an appeal to the US Supreme Court.”We are disappointed the court reversed the jury finding that Java is open and free for everyone,” a Google spokesperson told AFP. read more

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