Tag Archive for Tag: 上海kb最新

Tag: 上海kb最新 “The Vacation You Deserve Is Closer Than You Think” – a new CNTB campaign

first_imgAs we announced yesterday, the CNTB has launched a new campaign “The Vacation You Deserve Is Closer Than You Think”, which will be launched in the surrounding markets at the end of this week, ie at the beginning of June, on all key on – line and off – line communication channels. “The finalization of media plans related to markets whose citizens are likely to be able to visit Croatia after the opening of borders in their countries is underway. These are loyal tourists from neighboring countries such as Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovenia, Slovakia, Germany, Italy and Poland. A direct and intensive advertising call communication campaign has been prepared for them. ” said CNTB Director Kristjan Stanicic. Also, a new communication platform was launched last week EnjoyTheViewFromCroatia. The platform can be created by renters, restaurant owners, catering staff, agency staff, members of the tourist board, residents of the tourist destination and other actors of Croatian tourism by sending a photo or video that they think will best convey the beauty that makes guests they come to their place, whether it is a view of the sea, the sunset, a meadow, a square, a street or a city corner, the CNTB concludes. A special one was made for the needs of the campaign Web page i Instagram profile on which there are beautiful “views from Croatia”. “We have created an online platform or communication “window” that can be used by all Croatian tourism workers for their own promotion. The campaign is mostly focused on our important markets from which guests, due to the situation caused by the corona virus pandemic, will not arrive in Croatia so quickly. These are countries such as Great Britain, Scandinavian countries, France, Italy, but also distant markets such as China, USA and South Korea.” Staničić pointed out, inviting all tourist stakeholders to join the campaign and send their unforgettable view from Croatia. Photo: HTZlast_img read more

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Tag: 上海kb最新 This talented pop star is performing at NHL All-Star Game in San Jose

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having trouble viewing these photos on a mobile device.The 2019 NHL All-Star Game will offer up more than just such well-known hockey players as Erik Karlsson, Patrick Kane, Sidney Crosby and Auston Matthews.The event will also feature Bebe Rexha, the increasingly popular pop singer known for such hits as “I’m a Mess” and “Meant to Be,” and for gloriously taking on the Hollywood fashion industry.The league announced Thursday, Jan. 17, that the 29-year-old Rexha will …last_img read more

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Tag: 上海kb最新 Good Publicity for I.D.:

first_imgMichael Behe got interviewed in the UK newspaper The Guardian and was compared to Galileo for being condemned by the NAS curia.  See reprint on Discovery Institute.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img

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Tag: 上海kb最新 Storm Surge Carries Huge Boulders

first_img(Visited 18 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 A typhoon carried 180-ton rocks 150 feet up a beach—the largest transport recorded in recent times.Watch the video clip in a story on Live Science titled “Super Typhoon Shoved Car-Size Boulders Onto Philippine Beaches.”  The scene is pretty scary. Waves destroy a house in seconds in an eyewitness video of the “super typhoon” Haiyan that struck the Philippines in November, 2013.  With sustained winds of 195 mph and powerful surges of sea water, the storm carried limestone boulders the size of stretch limos as far as 600 feet inland, and 30 feet uphill.  One 30-foot stone estimated weighing 180 tons was carried along the beach 150 feet.“If we didn’t know this occurred from a typhoon, people would have started drawing tsunami maps,” said Andrew Kennedy, a coastal engineer at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana who counted hundreds of boulders during a damage survey soon after Haiyan hit. “There are so many, and they went so far.“How could a common typhoon have the power of a tsunami?  A mechanism identified in the 1950s was apparently responsible: infragravity waves.Robert Weiss, a coastal scientist at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, modeled Haiyan’s waves and storm surge, concluding that rare, tsunami-like waves called infragravity waves were responsible for scattering the huge boulders like they were seashells. This kind of wave forms when ordinary wave sets — the groupings coveted by surfers — merge into one large, long-period wave at steep drop-offs close to shore.This will make it difficult for investigators of prehistoric storm damage to distinguish between the two mechanisms, but it also underscores the tremendous power of moving water.Instant CanyonsAnother example of rapid change from moving water can be seen today in the northwest US.  CMI posted an article from 2002 by John Morris, geologist with ICR, about a canyon near Walla Walla, Washington that formed in six days.  Initially 10 feet deep and 6 feet wide, it grew to 1,500 feet long, 120 feet deep and 120 feet wide when water was diverted into it back in 1926.  Five million cubic feet of material were removed in less than a week.The eruption of Mt. St. Helens also showed the power of fluid motion.  A mudflow in 1982 carved a “miniature Grand Canyon” at 1/40th scale through sediments laid down by the initial 1980 eruption (see ICR article).  These canyons were observed to form in a matter of hours or days, but it’s also probable that other canyons were formed rapidly before observers were present.  It is now thought that Yellowstone’s Grand Canyon, for example, was carved quickly by water that breached ice dams, then eroded through rock weakened by hydrothermal activity (Yellowstone.net).Mars CanyonOn Mars, the major canyon system Valles Marineris is long enough to stretch across the United States.  Arizona’s Grand Canyon would fit in one of its tributaries.  Just this week, geologists presented evidence that it was carved by glaciers.  According to Space.com, researchers using data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter suggested the glacial origin due to high concentrations of jarosite, a rock that only forms on Earth in very acidic water.  “Getting an evaporating pool of water halfway up a 3-mile-high cliff is tricky, and the more we looked into the geologic context surrounding the deposit, the less likely a liquid water origin seemed,” one geologist said.  Remote sensing also detected evidence of opal in the canyon walls.These stories indicate that changes can happen quickly under the right conditions.  “Mr. Slow-and-Gradual” Charles Lyell did not know about infragravity waves.  Catastrophism became much more widely accepted a century after him, but his doctrine of millions of years of gradualism continues to infect popular thinking.  It also played a major role in Charles Darwin’s views of evolution.Arizona’s Grand Canyon is often still portrayed as a result of slow-and-gradual deposition of sediments.  The Tapeats Sandstone, though—the bottom layer of sediments above the Great Unconformity—is littered with house-size boulders.  The observational experience with Typhoon Haiyan should indicate the amount of flood surge power required to transport these boulders; it sure wasn’t some spring shower.  There are also major folds in the Tapeats, some of them continuing up into other formations above.  One fold at Carbon Canyon upturned the sandstone 90 degrees.  These folds must have occurred rapidly when the sediments were still soft, because there is no sign of cracking.What will it take to get science out of the rut dug by Charles Lyell?  Reinforcement by the media and simplistic interpretive programs have deepened that rut into a canyon that’s hard to get out of.  But we should, to get a better overview of the landscape.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海kb最新 How Could Plants Evolve? Answer: They Evolved

first_img(Visited 871 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Darwinism has replaced the need for demonstration in science with the convenience of assertion.When you read papers and articles that offer to explain how something evolved, what you often find are statements that they just evolved. Let’s see some examples.3D Body Evolution: Adding a New Dimension to Colonize the Land (Current Biology). The title suggests that readers will learn something about ‘3D Body Evolution’ in the case of plants about to colonize the land. One might anticipate learning about transitional forms, mutations, and natural selection. What the paper presents, however, is just a collection of assertions that plants did evolve.Complex multicellular plant bodies evolved in both generations of land plants.From unicellular organisms, multicellularity evolved multiple independent times in diverse eukaryotic lineages.Within some lineages, ‘complex’ mutlicellularity [sic], defined by the three-dimensional (3D) organization of the body plan, evolved from simple multicellular ancestors.Land plants represent one example, with both generations (haploid and diploid) evolving complex mutlicellularity [sic].The study highlights the importance of the CLV pathway for the morphological innovation of 3D body development in land plants and opens a new avenue to approach a mechanistic understanding of the evolution of the 3D patterning of a multicellular body during land plant evolution.Is that it? Surely there must be some empirical data to back up these assertions. All that the authors put forward, though, is a simplistic story about how certain complex enzyme pathways affecting the change from 2-D to 3-D patterning might have evolved in one species of moss, Physcomitrella. They are called CLAVATA (CLV) pathways, and they involve multiple complex protein parts.In summary, Whitewoods et al. found that the land plant-specific CLV peptide/receptor-like kinase pathway regulates orientations of cell division planes during developmental transitions from 2D to 3D growth in Physcomitrella. They also report that a novel CLV function found in the Physcomitrella gametophyte body in regulating cell division planes is conserved in flowering plant sporophyte bodies.There’s no evolution here. There is a complex pathway in a moss that is “conserved in flowering plants.” The short paper mentions nothing about natural selection. The only mutations mentioned damage things; they don’t invent new things. The paper’s summary promises, “A new study demonstrates that CLAVATA3-like peptides function via conserved receptors in Physcomitrella patens as key molecules for morphological innovation of 3D growth in land plants.” But search for how it does that, and you find no such innovation. They end by claiming that the “new avenue to approach the understanding of the evolution of the 3D patterning of a multicellular body” has been demonstrated. It sounds like an advertisement for vaporware or futureware has snookered the customer. Clearly, if evolutionists are only on an “avenue” by which they hope to “approach” understanding, they ain’t got no understanding yet. Their false confidence is founded on prior belief in “land plant evolution.” How did plants evolve? They evolved.Getting to the root of plant evolution (Science Daily). This press release from the University of Oxford actually offers an alleged transitional form. Here comes the promise:Despite plants and vegetation being key to the Earth’s ecosystem, little is known about the origin of their roots. However in new research, published in Nature, Oxford University scientists describe a transitional root fossil, from the earliest land ecosystem, that sheds light on how roots have evolved. Darwinists to the rescue. More will be known! One thing, though, is “known” from the outset: roots “have evolved.” When you already think you know the answer, and no other answers are permitted, can you really know anything? Yes: by the power of suggestion.The findings suggest that plant roots have evolved more than once, and that the characteristics of roots developed in a step-wise manner – with the central root organ evolving first. And the root cap subsequently coming later.Since we already know by fiat that roots evolved, we are not surprised to compound miracles. Roots evolved more than once! Presto. Now, about the step-wise manner, which would appear to support Darwin’s vision. Evidence for this comes from one fossil: a club moss that (according to evolutionists) branched off early in the evolution of land plants. A fossil of a club moss shows a meristem (emerging root or stem) without root hairs or a cap. From this one instance, a grand scenario takes root:The paper’s conclusion suggests that these roots are a transitional step towards modern-style, rooted vascular plants. The findings support the idea that, as this cap-less transitional structure appears in a plant that is already a lycopsid, roots with caps evolved separately in lycopsids and euphyllophytes from their common, root-less ancestors.Whatever this club moss lacked, it survived quite well, even if the Darwinians can be sure it lacked delicate root hairs in a fossil. Can the appearance of all land plants be deduced from a tiny fossil of one club moss? Every part of this story invokes the assumption of evolution. How did club mosses evolve? They evolved. How did plants evolve? They evolved.This is the kind of snow job that is turning vast numbers of students away from God and toward Darwinism. With grand bluffing, glittering generalities and the power of suggestion, students are led down a primrose path to absurdity. Professing to be wise, they have become fools. Professing to be scientific, they have become converts to the cult of Darwin. Bits of fossils are used as shiny pendulums to hypnotize them into thinking “Thisssss issss scienccccccce” while the teacher drugs them into euphoria about how much better they feel now that they have kicked out “religion” and that nasty old God of the Bible they might have learned about as kids. But this is not the experimental science of Joule or Faraday. It is a new Aristotelianism taught with authoritarianism. Plants evolved because it is their nature to evolve. Since the student now ‘knows’ that plants evolved (because that is their nature), wee bits of data work as props to illustrate the dogma. It’s deductive science, not inductive empiricism. Premise: plants evolved. Question: How did plants evolve? Deduction: plants evolved. Yes, there are difficulties, like Darwin’s Abominable Mystery (the origin of flowering plants), but no worries. The students already know the answer. Plants evolved. Even if structures had to evolve multiple times independently to fit the picture, they can believe any imaginative scenario—even multiple miracles—now that the answer is already a given.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海kb最新 Rainy weather plagues July

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The first half of July has left many farmers with very soggy, flooded fields and struggling crops all around the state of Ohio. It seems there was ample moisture pretty much everywhere in Ohio in the last couple of weeks in what has been a very wet start to the month.“What’s going on right now is obviously we’ve seen an incredible amount of rainfall across a lot of Ohio and that’s thanks to a very slow moving frontal boundary moving through a lot of the Ohio valley right now,” said Ed Vallee, meteorologist with BAMWX.com. “For a normal seven-day period here across the state of Ohio, typically we only see about an inch to maybe an inch and a quarter in any given week during the middle of July. During this very wet stretch a lot of places have seen that just last night. As we move through the seven-day period, a lot of areas have seen two to six inches of rain. So anywhere from two times to as much as six or seven times the normal amount of rainfall just in this past week.”The recent totals add to an already wet summer, before this most recent episode, Vallee said.“A normal 30-day period, you’re looking at about four or five inches of rain this time of the year and looking at some of the data that I’m seeing here, for the last 30 days across the state of Ohio we’ve ranged anywhere from four inches, which is about normal, all the way up to as much as fifteen inches in some places in northwestern Ohio. We’re certainly well above normal here this past month and obviously this is a very crucial time of the year so too much rain can certainly not be the greatest of things.”Vallee said things vary greatly depending on which part of the state and county a farm is located. He notes how some farms need a reprieve right away while others are doing ok for the time being.“We are getting into that time of year where obviously the pollination is occurring within the corn crop and our soybeans are progressing along as well. From the talks I’ve had with customers across the Corn Belt, especially the eastern belt like Ohio for example, some places are under water,” he said. “In places like northwestern Ohio, west central Ohio, the rain needs to stop fairly quickly. Unfortunately I don’t see that happening for the next 10 days. But farther to the west where the rainfall might not be quite as bad, I think the sprinkler can keep on coming so to speak.”Listen to the full conversation between meteorologist Ed Vallee and Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood.170713_EdValleeBAMWX_Intv_RainRainGoAway Ben Bowsher had the right idea in Allen County after yesterday’s heavy rains. On July 6 the town of Arcanum in Darke County got five inches of rain and the town was shut down. Photo by Eric Brown. The NW Ohio edge of field water quality monitoring station on the Stateler farm has plenty of monitoring to do after the flooding in the area. High winds compounded the soggy weather trouble in Darke County. Photo by Sam Custer, OSU Extension. Fairfield County was pounded by 4.5 to 5 inches of rain yesterday causing flash flooding in some areas on July 12. Streams and creeks in northern Fairfield County and southern Licking County were well out of their banks after another round of pounding rains July 12. Are this season’s crops flushed down the drain with all the rain? Hancock County fields turned into lakes in some areas. Photo by Jeff Reese. Hancock County flooding. Photo by Jeff Reese Hancock County flooding. Photo by Jeff Reese. Known for its long history of flooding, Findlay was looking at a fourth all-time highest flooding level after getting swamped this week. Photo by Jeff Reese. Photo by Evan Watson. Photo by Keith and Aubrianna Schroeder. Preble County flooding. Photo by Kerrick Wilson. Perry County roads were flooded. Photo by Matt Stackhouse. Photo by Linsey Howell. Plenty of water in northern Ohio in Ottawa County. Ross County got hit with heavy rains yesterday. Photo By Greg Ramsey. This Blanchard Valley River bottom road may flood…Photo by Shane Kellogg. Justin Petrosino with Stewart Seeds is scouting crops via a kayak. Photo by Greg McGlinch. A couple of herons are fishing in this Hancock County soybean field.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海kb最新 Task Force to Coordinate Rural Development Strategies

first_imgPrime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller says a task force is to be established to coordinate a series of government strategies aimed at enhancing rural development. Making her contribution to the 2013/14 Budget Debate in the House of Representatives on Tuesday, April 30, under the theme: “Jamaica: Going for Growth and Development – Unleashing Our Potential”, Mrs. Simpson Miller said the strategies include:developing agro parks to boost agricultural productivity and expand employment, as well as agro-industries to facilitate new product development, inclusive of neutraceuticals and other value-added products. Other targeted strategies include:drought mitigation; improving farm roads; community and eco-tourism; establishing additional community access points and increasing access to the internet and related services; providing access to affordable housing solutions;delivering outstanding land titles;and business development. Noting that rural development is a “critical” pillar of its planned development agenda, the Prime Minister said the administration will seek to implement these strategies over the next three years. “An integrated plan of rural development will arrest the trend of rural to urban migration which places pressure on urban centres. The main emphasis for rural development will be on the building of townships; establishment of business enterprises; provision of access to health care facilities, schools, water, roads, electricity, technology; and the creation of opportunities for economic advancement,” she stated. By Douglas McIntosh, JIS Reporterlast_img read more

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Tag: 上海kb最新 A step towards reconciliation Halifax launches committee to rethink Cornwallis

first_imgHALIFAX – In a move billed by one councillor as a historic step toward reconciliation with the Indigenous community, Halifax council has launched a special advisory committee on the commemoration of its controversial founder, Edward Cornwallis.Regional council voted 15-2 on Tuesday to create the expert committee, and is expected to choose its members behind closed doors.Coun. Shawn Cleary said the decision to rethink how the city honours Cornwallis is a step towards improving the municipality’s relationship with Mi’kmaq people.“This is historic for us,” he told council before the vote. “I’m hopeful this is another step in rebuilding the relationship that for the last 400 years has not been a terribly good relationship.”For some, Halifax’s founder may be the product of a bygone era, but he still played an important role in establishing the city and serving as governor of Nova Scotia.But to others, Cornwallis is a symbol of colonial oppression, a morally indefensible man who issued a bounty on the scalps of Mi’kmaq men, women and children.The special committee is expected to provide council with advice on what to do with a statue of Cornwallis in downtown Halifax, as well as make recommendations on honouring Indigenous history.The city briefly covered up the bronze figure of Cornwallis this summer as protesters converged on the statue and demanded it be pulled down.“Emotions tend to run high and people tend to get quite entrenched,” Coun. Waye Mason said. “I think it’s quite important that we approach this with the spirit of openness and we look at this with an open mind.”Halifax council narrowly defeated a similar motion Mason tabled in 2016 that would have seen experts and the public weigh in on the Cornwallis issue.“I’m really happy to see this day has finally come,” he said, noting that he’s been dealing with the issue since the city decided to rebuild the playground in Cornwallis Park in downtown Halifax three years ago, sparking fierce debate over the park’s name.Two amendments proposed Tuesday were both shot down. One would have eliminated the committee’s option of taking a “phased approach” to the work, which recommended deliberating first on the commemoration of Cornwallis and then investigating the broader question of honouring Indigenous history.A second rejected amendment would have removed remuneration. Some councillors expressed concern that paying members an honorarium of $150 per meeting, up to a maximum of $2,100, set a precedence of having to pay for work normally done by volunteers.The committee will be made up of eight community members, four of which will be based on nominations put forward by the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs.Coun. Steve Adams, who voted against the committee, said the Indigenous members will be under “immense pressure” to have the statue removed.“That will be a foregone conclusion. There will be immense pressure to have the statue taken away,” he told council. “I don’t think it’s fair to put them in that situation.”last_img read more

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