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Tag: 上海419龙凤论坛 localhost Charity talent show is the talk of the town!

first_imgA great night lies ahead for all who attend the charity talent show in Maggie’s Tavern this Saturday night.The event has created a lot of buzz in St. Johnston and surrounding areas, as entertaining acts get ready for their big moment on the stage.The charity show will be in aid of MS Ireland  – a very worthy cause which supports people with multiple sclerosis. Music, dancing and great craic are promised all night and everyone is welcome to join the fun.Call into Maggie’s Tavern from 9.30pm this Saturday 19th October to see the show that everyone’s been talking about!Admission is only €5 and a fun raffle will take place on the night with some amazing prizes. Charity talent show is the talk of the town! was last modified: October 14th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:charity talent showMaggie’s tavernMS IrelandSt Johnstonlast_img read more

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Tag: 上海419龙凤论坛 localhost Keeping the story of HIV alive in South Africa

first_imgThe Drama for Life festival at theUniversity of the Witwatersrand usesapplied drama and theatre practices inthe fight against HIV/Aids in Africa (Images: Drama for Life) MEDIA CONTACTS • Melissa Meyer HIV/Aids and the Media Project +27 11 715 5828/42 +27 72 778 5800 RELATED ARTICLES • Rhodes hosts world journalism meet • Reshaping reportage on Africa • Better HIV reporting in SA media • HIV in South Africa stabilisingNosimilo RamelaThe Life Beats workshop brought together artists, journalists, HIV activists and health experts from around Johannesburg to discuss ways in which to keep the story of the HIV/Aids epidemic alive.The gathering was held at the University of the Witwatersrand from 20 August to 21 August 2010.A joint initiative of the Drama for Life/Sex Actually Festival and the HIV/Aids and the Media Project, the workshop sought to bridge the gap between health and arts reportage on HIV/Aids.The workshop offered participants from the journalism and arts industry an opportunity to explore how HIV/Aids can be covered as a news story, and provided critical training on how to report about it in an accurate and responsible manner.The workshop ran concurrently with the Drama for Life Festival (DFL), which was started in 2006 to inspire the use of applied drama and theatre practices in the fight against HIV/Aids in Africa.Formal speakersAdrienne Sichel, a specialist writer and Wits School of Dramatic arts resident fellow 2010, was one of the speakers at the workshop. She highlighted the active role theatre has played over the years in South Africa and why it is an important medium to reach and teach people.“Theatre is immediate, which is why it will never die,” she said. “Good art picks up what society is doing. Using theatre, we have to humanise something that is very dehumanising.”Well-known health reporter Mia Malan looked at key issues journalist should remember and take into account when reporting on HIV/Aids. “Journalists have to understand the science of HIV/Aids when reporting on the topic,” she said. Malan added that accuracy in this regard was important, as the wrong information could mislead the public.She said HIV/Aids is like a mirror of society: “It shows us everything that is wrong with our society.” From a media point of view, she said it was one area that covered everything in journalism. “It covers science, human interest, policy, politics and lifestyle. Though HIV is not always news, it can be used to tell many stories about policy and many other issues affecting society.”Melissa Meyer from the HIV/Aids and the Media Project agreed: “HIV/Aids is a lens through which we can examine political and economic stability as well as social cohesion.”Arts writer and critic Zingi Mkefa looked at the link between HIV/Aids and art. He said art is not just about entertainment – it can also be used to understand issues like politics. “Through art we can see HIV/Aids as the invariable gift that can help us change the way we think, feel and talk,” he said. “The issue works harder than the work of art.”Director of the Wits Radio Academy and Mail & Guardian ombudsman Prof Franz Krüger tackled the ethics of reporting on HIV/Aids. “Truth-telling is a core universal value,” he said, encouraging journalists to “get the science right, debunk nonsense – it is a public health hazard to report on wonder drugs or people who promise instant healing”.He said journalists should always ensure they tell the complete story. “The ethical call of reporting on HIV/Aids is to tell the story fully and well despite our values, our industry and ourselves.”  Krüger said journalists had a duty to fight the stigma associated with HIV/Aids, and minimise harm when covering the epidemic.Dr Sindi van Zyl from Anova Health Institute said journalists and the arts were the most important tools to in reaching affected individuals and determining what they understand about HIV/Aids. “Patients believe what they read in the papers or what they watch on television, or live theatre.”She said journalists and artists should promote important messages about HIV/Aids in their work, encouraging people to get tested regularly and seek out the correct treatment and information from their nearest hospitals or clinics.Deep NightAs part of the workshop, participants attended the final dress rehearsal for Deep Night – a physical theatre piece that will be shown during the DFL festival from 21 to 24 August. It has been brought to the festival by The Forgotten Angle Theatre Collaborative.Through dance, Deep Night forces audience to feel and experience the darkness of Johannesburg night life. Directed by PJ Sabbagha and performed by cast members Dada Masilo, Bifikile Sedibe, Songezo Mcillizeli and Ivan Teme, the show also looks at the reality and presence of HIV/Aids in South AfricaSabbagha said: “The show explores the stuff that HIV reveals about us as society – desire and fear of being alone.” He added that Deep Night is about “the moments when we’re so intoxicated, we lose grip of the reality and the responsibility to protect ourselves from HIV – that’s when HIV is most dangerous.”In portraying the characters they play, the performers drew from their own personal experiences and observed environment. From seduction to sexual desperation and companionship, the show is raw with emotion.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海419龙凤论坛 localhost GIVEAWAY! Win a Canon 6D Professional DSLR Camera

first_img20.2MP Full-Frame CMOS Sensor3.0″ Clear View High Resolution LCDDIGIC 5+ Image ProcessorBuilt-In Wi-Fi and GPS ConnectivityFull HD 1080p with Manual Controls11-Point AF with Center Cross-Type Point63-Zone Dual Layer Metering SensorExtended ISO Range of 50-102400Up to 4.5 Full Resolution FPSBuilt-In HDR & Multiple Exposure Modes For more info check out the full specs at B&H Photo Video.About our Giveaway PartnersNew York based B&H Photo Video & Pro Audio  is the world’s leading retailer in photography, video and audio equipment.  B&H serves the pro market fromtheir extensive website and NYC storefront location.  Their wide-selection of high quality gear and commitment to customer satisfaction, makes B&H Photo Video & Pro Audio well equipped to handle your professional photo, video and audio needs.  Visit B&HPhotoVideo.com to check out all the leading gear!LearningDSLRVideo.com is an online community led by DSLR authority Dave Dugdale. Dave share’s his passion for creating high quality DSLR videos in his frequent video tutorials, product reviews and engaging interviews. Check out THE STORE, a new extension of LearningDSLRVideo.com that provides high-quality in-depth video tutorials and training on DSLR cameras, equipment and techniques. Premiumbeat.com is a curated royalty free music website that provides high-quality royalty free music tracks and sound effects for use in new and traditional media projects.  With thousands of handpicked tracks in more than 30 music styles, Premiumbeat music is ideal for websites, online videos, mobile apps, television, radio, feature films and other professional applications. UPDATE: THE CONTEST HAS NOW ENDED. Thanks to all who entered.Please follow us on Twitter and Facebook for info on future giveaways!Royalty free music leader Premiumbeat.com, in partnership with LearningDSLRVideo.com and B&H Photo Video, are giving away a Canon 6D DSLR camera! This 20.2 megapixel full frame DSLR captures exceptionally high quality still images and full 1080P HD video.Enter to win once DAILY through May 31, 2013.Receive 2 more entries for every participant you refer.One lucky winner will be chosen at random and contacted on 6/1/2013.Must be over 18 to enter. Official giveaway rules here.About the Canon 6D DSLRlast_img read more

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Tag: 上海419龙凤论坛 localhost Documentary Tips: Capturing the Who, What, When, Where, and Why

first_imgDocumentary film is only as good as its story. Consider the following filmmaking advice when capturing documentary exposition.To tell a good story, you have to get really good at exposition and setting things up. For documentaries, in particular, this can be tricky because you’re often dealing with real-life people and complicated issues.In my time as a run-and-gun documentary journalist, I had to develop many different ways to help tell (or often, show) the who, what, when, where, and — most importantly — the why of your documentary’s story.There are several tricks for this — some simple and direct, a few more complicated and stylized. So, if you’re setting out on your own documentary storytelling project, here are some filmmaking tips for capturing the who, what, when, where, and why.Scene-Setting Exteriors and SignageI’d say that the most common (and often, obvious) way to set up exposition for your documentary story is with your standard exterior shots. These can often be pretty boilerplate, and you’ll also see them in similar corporate and commercial-style projects, but if done right, they can be quite cinematic and helpful.When shooting exteriors, you’re looking to capture the “where.” Try looking for shots that are as wide and expansive as possible, to give context into where you’re shooting. From there, you can start to focus in on the who, what, and when.If you’re shooting a documentary about a basketball player, for example, starting with a wide exterior of the player’s high school gymnasium (hopefully with a sign out front) would be a good way to begin.Thematic Close-Up RevealsImage via guruXOX.Instead of starting as wide as possible, you can also consider starting with a close-up on some item (or perhaps person) to begin revealing visual information early.From close-ups, you can build intimacy — as well as insights — into the “who” or “what” of your documentary’s story, as you get wider to reveal more.Using the same basketball documentary example, you could also start with a macro-lens focusing on a basketball, or the player’s shoes, before slowly revealing the player in question.Straight from Your SubjectOne of my favorite techniques for getting the who, what, when, where, and why exposition for a documentary project is by simply asking your main subject to give it to you. Sounds crazy, right? And I have to say that, from experience, not every subject can deliver the goods. But if you have a particularly talented individual who likes to talk, they can be very valuable in helping you set up your story.My usual opening question would go something like this: “If you don’t mind, could you introduce yourself to the camera and tell us who you are, where we are right now, what’s going on, and . . . why does that matter?”At the very least, you’ll have footage of them introducing themselves, which can be useful in the edit. However, if they are blessed with the gift of gab, you might find yourself with a soundbite succinctly and authentically establishing all the exposition you need.Text and Lower ThirdsImage from Rocketstock’s “Equation” pack.Alternatively (and don’t take this advice as a cop-out to setting exposition organically), you could always use text on-screen and/or lower thirds to establish a good deal of the who, what, when, where, or why information.Text on-screen can be powerful when used sparingly. Date and location are usually the primary facts to put on-screen for context — especially if you’re dealing with multiple timelines in your documentary.Lower thirds are also very much a part of the documentary lexicon, these days. So no one will blame you for using them to tell your audience the “who” for your subject’s name — and perhaps a little information about their title or relevance.And there are some great resources online for working with text and lower thirds, which can make your documentaries a little more stylized. Here are some text templates and free animated lower thirds.Counterpoint: Try Hiding Some ElementsAs you grow as a documentary filmmaker, you’ll begin to recognize which of these expositional elements best suit your project. In many cases, once you really define your stories (and narratives), you may find that it can be beneficial to not provide your audience with all the information, right away.If you’re editing your documentary project, as well as shooting, try experimenting with what information is most captivating to an audience (in the beginning) and what information might be best to bury for a later reveal.Cover image by Elizaveta Galitckaia.For more documentary filmmaking tips and tricks, check out some of these articles:Make Your Documentaries Matter with Awe-Inspiring MaterialA Complete Guide to Documentary FilmmakingThe 6 Types of Documentary Films7 Reasons Why You Need a Producer for Your DocumentaryDocumentary Editing Tips for Working with Lots of Footagelast_img read more

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