Tag Archive for Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf

Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf Hero Cech calls for Di Matteo to be given Chelsea manager’s job

first_imgGoalkeeper Petr Cech insisted that interim boss Roberto Di Matteo had done enough to be given the Chelsea manager’s job after the Blues’ Champions League triumph in Munich.Di Matteo has inspired a remarkable turnaround that has seen the club secure the European title for the first time and win the FA Cup.And Cech told Sky: ” Whatever happens to him he has got two fantastic cups. He’s done enough to get the job but now it is up to the board to decide.”Cech was a hero for Chelsea, saving a penalty in normal time and in a dramatic shoot-out.“Today I faced six penalties and six times I went the right way. It was a rollercoaster ride,” he said.“We all enjoyed it. When it goes to extra-time there is pressure and I thought Robben would go for power and shoot that way.”More reaction to follow later.Who was your Chelsea man of the match? Click here to voteFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf Is Creationism on the Decline? If So, Why?

first_imgA poll shows decreasing support for Biblical creationism. What factors are causing this?by Dr Jerry BergmanA new Gallup poll shows, for the first time since the poll on this subject began, “a notable decline in the percentage of Americans — including Christians — who hold to the ‘Young Earth’ creationist view that humankind was created in its present form in the past 10,000 years, evolution playing no part.”[i] According to the poll, taken in May, the portion of the American public taking the creation position now stands at 38%. Furthermore, fifty-seven percent accept the “scientific consensus that human beings evolved from less advanced forms of life over millions of years.”[ii] The poll reveals the largest factor in the shift is the jump in the number of Christians who see evolution as God’s way of creating life on Earth and continuing to shape it today.Vol. I (2011)A major reason for the result is, I believe from years of research on the behavior of Darwinians, the ghettoizing and outright persecution of out-of-the-closet persons who have scientific concerns about Darwinism. This has been well-documented in the United States and other countries.[iii] Former Assistant Secretary of State, Kim Holmes, concluded that college administrators “impose limits against Christian and conservative groups, enforcing a double standard of scrutiny” compared to non-Christians and liberals.[iv] For example, University of Michigan PhD Professor Marvin Olasky advises students who accept the creation worldview to face the fact that someMarxists, feminists, and other “-ists” are totalitarians who get pleasure out of making omelets by cracking student eggs. As a student, you’re in a position of weakness, so discretion in this instance may be valorous: Don’t take the course. If you have no alternative, hold on to all your papers and essay tests, and—when confronting totalitarians—tape what goes on in the classroom or in professor/student conferences. If you can’t win internally, you might be able to apply external pressure through conservative journalists.[v]Olasky adds that Christians and conservatives have been saying for decades that “the leftism of most college professors doesn’t matter … This year we’ve found that many have paid attention. The evidence: Socialist Bernie Sanders overwhelmingly won the votes of millennial college graduates.”[vi] Olasky’s new book Passing on the Right: Conservative Professors in the Progressive University in support of his conclusion, published by Oxford University Press, carefully documentsa sad picture of academic bias and conservative cowardice at major universities … quotations from numerous closeted right-of-center professors tell the story. Here are some: “I just bite my tongue. …I just deliberately lie. …I learned I should keep my mouth shut. …It is dangerous to even think [a conservative thought] when I’m on campus, because it might come out of my mouth. …[It’s] exhausting. …You’re not greeted, your greeting isn’t returned in the hall, graduate students are urged not to work with you.”[vii]Vol. II (2016)The fact is “Among academics, the pressure to conform is insidious… a 2015 report of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) organization finds that policies severely restrict students’ right to free speech at over half of the 437 universities it surveyed.”[viii] The same is true of professors’ freedom of speech. Although exceptions occur, “conservatives who publish still perish.” What can a conservative or Christian professor do to survive?One solution is to hide as a graduate student to get a job, hide as an assistant professor to get tenure, hide as an associate professor to get a full professorship, and hide as a full professor to get an endowed chair. But that’s no way to live—and once you start it’s hard to stop.[ix]In another case, Professors Shields and Dunn quote a literature professor who observed that professorswho hide on the road to a full professorship have “fifteen years of acculturation into cowardice and furtiveness. Suddenly you’re 38 years old and now you’re going to be bold? It doesn’t happen. People …  have kids. They’ve got bills to pay.…  many [universities] don’t welcome conservative perspectives, and if they did, their socialist colleagues would harass them. Organizations with self-perpetuating boards of directors can readily become corrupt. Most university faculties are self-perpetuating.[x]The antagonism against Darwin Doubters is also clear in an article titled “The Twenty Greatest Blunders in Science in the Last Twenty Years.” One blunder the author lists is not to teach Darwinism as an undisputed fact. She defined evolution as progressing from molecules to man by natural selection favoring variations caused by damage to the genome (mutations). The article starts out by noting that, in 1995 Colorado students would no longerbe tested on evolution, Charles Darwin’s theory that, through an endless series of genetic mutations, we all developed from single-celled organisms. “I believe in divine creation,” said Clair Orr, Colorado’s Chairman of the state’s Board of Education.[xi]She added that, in view ofthe trend of treating all theories of how we got here [i.e. human origins] as equal, Marc Abrahams, of Annals of Improbability Research, has a suggestion: Why not teach the theory of Chonosuke Okamura, a Japanese paleontologist who became convinced that patterns of water seepage in rocks were “mini-fossils” and that life was descended from mini-horses, mini-cows, and mini-dragons. “It’s kind of like forming an evolutionary theory out of cloud formations,” says Abrahams.[xii]My response is that teaching other creation stories is an excellent approach because it allows students to contrast the Genesis account with the other creation accounts. Students will soon understand the enormous contrast between the two creation accounts and realize that Genesis does not contain mythical stories, such as turtles holding up the earth, nor creation by one god tearing another apart and creating the sun, moon and earth from the body parts as do some of the other creation accounts.[xiii] Genesis is a straightforward narration of the creation events, without any need for columns of turtles, body parts of gods falling to earth, and other fanciful elements common to pagan creation myths.[i] “Creationism support is at a new low. The reason should give us hope.” Tom Krattenmaker, 2017. Opinion columnist, USA Today.[ii] Krattenmaker, 2017[iii] Bergman, Jerry 2016. Silencing the Darwin Skeptics. Southworth, WA: Leafcutter Press.[iv] Holmes, Kim. 2016. The Closing of the Liberal Mind.  New York: Encounter Books. p. 164.[v]  Olasky, Marvin. 2016. “Survivor’s Guide: Learn from Professors, but be Willing to Talk Back.” World Magazine, September 3, p. 64.[vi]  Olasky, 2016, p. 64[vii] Olasky, 2016, p. 64[viii] Holmes, 2016, p. 164[ix] Olasky, 2016, p. 64[x] Olasky, 2016, p. 64[xi]Newman, Judith. 2000. “Twenty of the Greatest Blunders in Science in the Last Twenty Years.” Discover, 21(10):78-83, October, p. 83, emphasis added.[xii] Holmes, 2000, p. 83[xiii] Bergman, 2016.Dr Jerry Bergman, professor, author and speaker, is a frequent contributor to Creation-Evolution Headlines. See his Author Profile for his previous articles. (Visited 865 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSharelast_img read more

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Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf South Africa scores at 2010 SEED Awards

first_img4 January 2010 The device is made from plastic, is fully portable and doesn’t require any running water or electricity to work. Harrison says that the product can make a major difference to the lives of women who have large families and spend many hours washing clothes by hand. The SEED Initiative, a UN Environmental Programme (UNEP) project, has rewarded six South African businesses and development projects, that have proved they’re paying more than just lip service to sustainable development and social and economic upliftment, in its 2010 awards programme. The fertiliser soaks up the water and forms a gel, ensuring that the seeds remain moist and germination is more successful, while the paper casing prevents birds from eating the seeds out of the soil. Six South African entrepreneurs and development organisations have received international recognition for their contribution to building a viable green economy. This focus was part of a larger project connected to UNEP’s Green Economy Initiative and was funded mainly by the European Union. UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner said in a statement that the winners “exemplify the strong spirit of entrepreneurship in the developing world and its significance in creating a green economy”. Ashley Westaway, a BRC fieldworker, says that when the idea for the project first came about, recreational fishing and tourism were identified as two sectors with potential in the area. “The Northern Keiskammahoek area, where the project is located, has a good river and dam network,” Westaway says. The strips carry all the instructions to grow vegetables successfully – the correct depth at which the seeds should be planted is indicated with a coloured line and the seeds are even placed at the correct distance apart from one another inside the strips. She hopes that the product will encourage more South Africans, including schools, clinics, community centres, churches and rural communities, to cultivate their own food gardens. In doing this, everyone will have a constant source of nutritious vegetables. The South African winners were selected from a large variety of entrants, but what they all have in common are business models that prioritise improved livelihoods, address poverty and marginalisation, and focus on sustainable natural resources management. The 2010 Seed Awards received applications from about 60 countries, and overall, there were 30 global winners. Co-founder Eddie Griffiths says the surrounding communities have rallied to support the project. Farmers in the area, who in the past always buried their waste products, now support the project by delivering their waste for recycling to the landfill site where the project is based. It didn’t take long for Amatola to get noticed. Members of the Cata Village, the Border Rural Committee (BRC) and experts from the Rhodes University Department of Ichthyology and Fisheries Science (DIFS) started working on the project only about a year ago. Onsite accommodation chalets are also available and have been operational since 2008. As more people visit the area, marginalised communities in the Keiskammahoek area can benefit from much-needed skills training and job creation. “We hope that the market will respond, as there are many perceptions out there about safety in former homeland areas,” he says. The majority of entries were in the agriculture and rural development sector. However, there was a strong focus on projects dealing with climate change and energy, the conservation of biodiversity, and waste management. A panel of independent international experts selected the winners. The Mooi River Waste Reclaiming project in the Midlands in KwaZulu-Natal provides an opportunity for previously unemployed people to work as waste pickers and earn an income from recycling waste. The IziWasha hand-held clothes washing device was developed by a South African engineer for people who live in low-income communities and are unable to afford automatic washing machines. The manufacturing hub for the seed strips is based in Illovo in Johannesburg and Reid works with 12 previously unemployed moms, who hand package each seed strip. At the moment 10 vegetables are packaged, but in the future she wants to expand the product line to include flowers and herbs. Each strip is also colour coded for easy identification of vegetables: for example, tomato is red and beetroot is purple. The paper strip is 3.5cm wide and is purchased in metre lengths. FTFA has also developed South Africa’s first carbon calculator. The organisation hopes that this tool will help individuals and companies calculate their carbon footprint, and be more aware of their impact on the environment. Highlighting African innovation The IziWasha is also good for the environment, as a user will no longer have to wash their clothes in rivers. This will reduce water pollution and increase river water quality. The appliance comes with easy to understand operating instructions and guidelines to safely dispose of washing water. “It is physically demanding and time consuming to hand wash clothes. Women also often complain of backache,” she says. He says the fishery project has also invested in human capacity building and training. The fishery has created many jobs for people in the community to clear invasive alien vegetation on the banks of the Mnyameni Dam and Cata River. Reel Gardening It was founded in 2002 by UNEP, the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to realise the objectives of the Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development and the Millennium Development Goals. She developed pre-fertilised seed strips that contain seeds and all the other ingredients needed to plant vegetables. Besides watering, minimal input is needed. The South African winners are: the IziWasha hand-held laundry device; the Zondi BuyBack Initiative; Amatola Wild Trout Fishery; Food & Trees for Africa; Claire Reid Reel Gardening; and Mooi River Waste Reclaiming. Claire Reid, the brain behind Reel Gardening, never thought that a school science project would turn into a viable business concept: “I realised that cultivating a vegetable garden is time consuming, and it is expensive to buy fertiliser and seed – just to find that the seeds don’t germinate,” Reid says. The Resentse Sinqobile Trust, trading as the Zondi BuyBack Initiative, established a successful buyback centre, which recycles and repurposes household waste such as cans and plastic into products that can be sold. This initiative has helped to reduce litter, provide more employment opportunities and run an educational program. Amatola Wild Trout Fishery “We’ve done some market research in communities and the response to the product has been very positive. People see a lot of value in it,” says Harrison. The SEED Initiative is a global network that identifies projects and businesses that have innovative, entrepreneurial approaches to sustainable development. “You also don’t need large areas of land – if you live in the city, a small patio garden or balcony is all you need,” she says. Other local winners Reid went on to win this prize, and also scooped the Woman of the Year Award in the Water for Scientific Research “below the age of 35” category. She was nominated for the Shoprite Checkers Woman of the Year in Science and Technology, where she came in the top three. IziWasha is planning to launch the product to the general market in the second quarter of 2011. “The IziWasha is filling a need that has been ignored and many companies have not seen this as a priority market,” says Rebecca Harrison, CEO of IziWasha Ltd. FTFA has, with the support of funders and the endorsement of the government, established many thriving projects such as skills training in natural resource management and the development of organic permaculture gardens for impoverished communities. Winners also receive business support, based on the specific needs of each project. This includes access to technical expertise and knowledge, finding new sources of finance and the development of business plans. The seed strips come with instructions in English, Afrikaans, isiZulu, Sesotho, Sepedi, Setswana and isiXhosa. Visual instructions are also printed. The instructions are easy to understand and the product is suitable for any age, from young children to the elderly. “Children love it because the strips are so colourful,” she says. Once the biodegradable paper capsule has served its purpose, it will decompose and become compost for the soil. The SEED Initiative will host an awards ceremony for all the winners, in their home countries. The programme does not offer a money prize, but gives each winner access to business services as well as the opportunity to network and build relationships with new partners. The international exposure and publicity is priceless. He anticipates that the fishery will become a well-known tourism destination for recreational fly-fisherman. “The trout we have here is wild and for fisherman, this is very attractive as it gives them more credit in fishing circles,” he says. The area is home to both brown and rainbow trout, which is also a drawcard for fisherman. The project will run a strict “catch-and-release” system, instead of restocking fish from time to time. Although trout in this area have well-established breeding populations, this policy will help protect indigenous fish species such as the endangered border barb. “The area has so much to offer and the terrain is absolutely magnificent with indigenous forests and a variety of bird life,” Westaway says. The Rhodes University DIFS conducted feasibility studies and the findings were positive. Westaway says that the project’s sustainable model for eco-friendly community upliftment put it in the running for a SEED award. “It strikes a good balance between the environment, social and economic elements. The project is strong in all the components that the judges were looking for.” Even before the SEED award, her invention attracted much attention. The Department of Water Affairs and Forestry nominated the reel gardening product for the South African Junior Water Prize as it reduces water wastage by 80%. The Amatola Wild Trout Fishery is South Africa’s first recreational fly fishery owned, managed and operated by a local community. It is also the only business in the Eastern Cape to receive a 2010 SEED Award. IziWasha Visit the SEED website for a full list of the 2010 winners. Food & Trees for Africa (FTFA) is making a positive difference by placing issues such as climate change, greening of urban areas, sustainable resource management and food security under the spotlight. Qurban Rouhani, DIFS programme manager, says rainbow and brown trout were not indigenous to South Africa, but both species were successfully introduced to the Cata area in the early 1900s. The area has major fishing potential, but it was never developed after the area was expropriated for inclusion in the former Ciskei homeland. This year, the organisation’s awards programme emphasised initiatives from South Africa, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Egypt, Ghana, Rwanda and Senegal, as well as Sri Lanka, Colombia and China. The entries ranged from combined efforts of non-governmental organisations, women’s and youth groups, to labour organisations, public authorities, international agencies and academia. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf South Africa: art and culture versus growth and jobs

first_img25 January 2016This opinion piece by Jen Snowball, Professor of Economics at Rhodes University was first published on The Conversation website on 20 January 2016. An indication of growing international interest in the potential of cultural and creative industries can be seen in a recent set of Unesco guidelines on how to measure and compile statistics about the economic contribution of the cultural industries.But should this be the only reason for funding arts and culture?Cultural industries can be defined as those whose major outputs have some symbolic value – such as fine arts, film and craft – but also possibly including jewellery design, publishing and fashion.Creative industries are defined more broadly. These have knowledge as their major input, and in addition to cultural goods and services could include things such as software design and internet services.Unesco has provided guidelines on ways in which these industries can be classified. But there is still no international consensus. Nor is there likely to be, since different countries will have very different levels of involvement and focus that may shape what information is useful for them.Cultural Times, the first global map of the cultural and creative industries, which was recently released, acknowledges the societal value of arts and culture.Undeniably, culture and creativity have been the cement that binds together not only hearts and souls, but entire societies and nations.This survey quantifies the global economic and social contribution of the sector. The study analyses 11 cultural and creative industry sectors. They are: advertising, architecture, books and newspapers and magazines, gaming and movies, and music, performing arts, radio, television and visual arts.Cultural Times assesses the contribution of cultural and creative industries to economic growth. It estimates that they generate US$250 billion in revenue a year, creating 29.5 million jobs worldwide.The report helps to demonstrate the value of arts and culture. It provides a good rationale for government support of arts and culture, especially in developing countries where there are so many other demands on the public purse.Contribution to jobs and growth in South AfricaSouth Africa is increasingly beginning to focus on its cultural and creative industries as potential contributors to economic growth and job creation. This is reflected in the report, Mzansi’s Golden Economy, which sets out ways in which the arts, culture and heritage sectors can contribute to the growth and development of the country’s economy.In addition, the government recently established the National Cultural Observatory. It will act as a hub for information and research about the economic and social impact of the creative and cultural industries.South Africa did its first cultural and creative industries mapping study in 2014. Though not yet publicly available, it showed that the industries had created between 162 809 and 192 410 jobs, about 1.08% to 1.28% of employment in the country, and that they contribute 2.9% to gross domestic product.Based on interviews with a wide variety of more than 2 000 people involved in the cultural and creative sector, the study also found that firms tended to be small, with more than a quarter (27%) having only one employee, and a further third (34%) employing between two and five people.Women and men were about equal in proportion. More than three-quarters (77%) were from black, coloured or Indian race groups.Given the very severe youth unemployment in South Africa, the industries may be particularly important for job creation: 22% of employees are younger than 18, 18% between 19 and 24, and 19% between 25 and 30. This means that 60% of the workforce in the industries is younger than 34.These findings echo worldwide trends. The global mapping study found that employment in the industries was relatively open to people from all ages and backgrounds (but especially the young), and dominated by small firms. In developing countries, production is dominated by the informal economy.Other spin-offsThe industries are also a potentially important contributor to social cohesion and nation-building through the promotion of intercultural dialogue, understanding and collaboration. This is strongly emphasised in the Department of Arts and Culture’s most recent strategic plan, which was not available online at the time of publication.These are part of a range of spin-offs that artistic production can offer, beyond the straight “instrumental value” – those values that, while undeniably important, are essentially spin-offs of the main point of artistic production.The “intrinsic” values and aims of culture, “art for art’s sake”, are things such as: to entertain, to delight, to challenge, to give meaning, to interpret, to raise awareness, and to stimulate.These non-market values are difficult to measure in monetary terms, but are just as important as the instrumental values.While jobs can be created by many economic activities, what other kinds of production can generate these same intrinsic values?Cultural capital is one. This is defined as the sum total of a country’s wealth or stock of art, heritage and other kind of cultural expression. Like other kinds of capital it needs to be invested in – otherwise it will depreciate and be devalued over time.Public and private sponsorship and support of the arts is particularly important for those producers whose main focus is intrinsic value. Such cultural production is often challenging or disturbing and, while it has a big impact on collective thinking, may not be a financial or market success or may be distributed for free. Think, for example, of the role played by music in the fight against apartheid.While recognising and supporting the very important role that the cultural and creative industries play in the economy, I would argue that we shouldn’t lose sight of the unique intrinsic values that they generate. This includes the reflection and shaping of national and individual identities.Source: The Conversationlast_img read more

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Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf UCT students win women-only hackathon

first_imgStudents from the University of Cape Town won a trip to an international conference in the US at a women-only hackathon.Bonang Mogatusi, Zainab Mobaad, Thandiwe Nyandeni and Tshegofatso Komane are in the team Techtress. They won third position in the hackathon held by GirlCodeZA in Johannesburg on 6 August 2017. (Images: Melissa Javan)Melissa JavanA group of female students from the University of Cape Town won a hackathon on 6 August 2017 and will be attending an international information technology conference for women in the US as their prize.Kungela Mzuku, Fadzai Mupfunya, Lorna Nqodi and Valerie Tshiani, all students, took part in the #GirlCodeHack run by the nonprofit organisation, GirlCodeZA. It is the organisation’s fourth annual women-only hackathon held in Johannesburg.The four women would be exposed to big American companies that had a female developer base, said the organisers. These included Microsoft, Facebook and Twitter.This year’s #GirlCodeHack has been won by a team of ladies from UCT comprised of @lerie_m @KungelaMzuku @Call_Me_Fadzi and Lorna Nqodi pic.twitter.com/UY5u8tV1Jm— Kayla De Jesus (@KaylaBiancs) August 6, 2017Zandile Keebine, Jeanette Theu and Tinyiko Simbine, who all work at tech companies, are the founders of GirlCodeZA. Speaking to Brand South Africa previously, Keebina said she had been to many hackathons where she was either the only female or one of a few to attend. This prompted her to approach her employer to organise a women-only hackathon. GirlCodeZA started in 2014.How the hackathon grewAccording to Keebine, the purpose of the hackathon is for women to connect, network and inspire each other. “We want them to see they are not alone [in the male-dominated industry] and that collaboration is key.“Just from this weekend’s event we can see there are many women in the tech industry.”There were about 20 contestants in the 2016 hackathon; this year there were more than 80. “When we started out, it was just a fun thing to do. However, it seems the contestants are a lot more serious now. They understand that there are opportunities for them to position themselves,” Keebine said.“The women are looking for bursaries and job opportunities. We asked them to send us their curriculum vitaes.”She said the hackathon allowed the contestants to innovate and create solutions for everyday problems. They had 30 hours in which to design their response. “Each team then creates a website or an app or an internet of things solution. It is up to them to decide.”Keebine explained that being able to create a solution showed companies that the developer had the skills needed in the industry.And the winner is… Rubies!!! Congrats team, well deserved! Enjoy your time in the US! #GirlCodeHack 2017 pic.twitter.com/q5PwvBMd4W— Sarah Druce (@sarahkdruce) August 6, 2017Mzuku said: “It will be our first trip to the USA. We are still in shock [that we won].”She and her three teammates are studying information systems in the Commerce Faculty at the University of Cape Town. “Our department told us about the hackathon and sponsored the trip.”They will attend the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing, believed to be the world’s largest gathering of female technologists, in October this year. The event is produced by the Anita Borg Institute.The hackathon experienceThembi Mbatha says it was a struggle to execute their idea at the hackathon, but working together helped to solve it.Thembi Mbatha, a contestant, said it was the first time she had taken part in this hackathon. “I came here knowing no-one. I’m a shy person,” she confessed.“As a woman in the technology industry, an event like this makes you realise you are not the only one. It’s great to see more women are growing in the industry and coming up with solutions.”She learned how to work in a team to create a solution, she said. “[The hackathon] is awesome. We also met mentors who groomed us. I’m also willing to share my skills in the future.”But hackathons should not only take place in cities, Mbatha said. “I feel hackathons should be taken to rural areas as well.”Prudence Netshituka says it was stressful to come up with an idea for the hackathon, but she learned a lot from the experience.Prudence Netshituka is a systems integrator who entered the hackathon as an individual. “It was scary to enter as an individual, and also it being my first time here. I had no idea what to expect. When I arrived here, there were others who had entered as individuals.”They had to form groups and come up with an idea to solve a problem in their community. Each idea had to show how they differentiated themselves from other teams.“It’s important to have such events,” said Netshituka. “It’s important for us to network, share knowledge and to know that we [women in the industry] are not alone.”About the knowledge sharing that took place, she said: “Often when you are in the field, you tend to form a group with people who have the same knowledge as you do and you are limited to that information. Here we learned different types of technologies from each other.”Both Netshituka and Mbatha said they had a lot of fun.The importance of sisterhoodGertruida Maritz has been in the information technology industry since 2010. She says having others around her with the same interests when she started studying information systems as a subject, fuelled her passion for it.Gertruida Maritz, a software engineer, was one of the mentors; she helped the contestants come up with viable business ideas. “It should also fit in with the theme. The method on which each team builds their idea — for example, a website or an app — should be something the women are comfortable working with.”Most of the ideas were related to the medical field, she said. “There was a solution related to the voting system, too, as well as something for business — how to make binding easier.”Maritz was excited to see so many passionate young women in the technology industry. “There are some passionate and very smart ladies I’ve seen here. They have this fire in their chest. It reminds me of the younger version of myself.”Mentorship and women supporting each other was a big deal — she was recently supported by a woman in the accounting department in her workplace. “It can get hard in a male-dominated environment. You have a lot of emotions as a woman, but you push through it.”Whenever she had been in a difficult situation, it had been women who had helped her in her career.Hackathon participants tweeted their experiences:#GirlCodeHack These girls ne… *chokes with pride* Mama Bear is so proud pic.twitter.com/i6V3JO1WVU— BontuNative (@Black_Power_M) August 6, 2017Second team Kgosigadi the app, addressing gender violence amongst other things #WomenNotObject #GirlCodeHack pic.twitter.com/MmVE21ecMo— #GirlCodeHack?? (@GirlCode_za) August 6, 2017Fantastic ideas coming through! So inspiring! @EricssonMENA #GirlCodeHack pic.twitter.com/0nrj4JEcdR— Sheila Isidro (@Shay911) August 5, 2017Sources: GirlCodeZA and Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf The Xenia Effect in corn

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Xenia Effect refers to the effect of foreign pollen on kernel characteristics. Cross-pollinationXenia Effectoccurs in corn because it is a monecious, which means that it has both male (the tassel) and female (the ear) flowers on a single plant.The Xenia effect occurs when pollen from the tassel of one corn variety moves from one field to another, landing on the silks of another variety which fertilizes and produces. The picture above is an example of the Xenia effect, found by Seed Consultants agronomists this fall. Flint (also known as “Indian” corn) was planted a short distance from a field of hybrid dent corn. Both the flint corn and dent corn were flowering at the same time, allowing the flint corn to pollinate some kernels on the dent ears. The cross-pollination exhibited by the Xenia Effect can influence testing procedures and production of specialty corn crops.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf Industrial Solar?

first_imgAdvantages of smaller PV systemsDespite the (relatively minor) economy-of-scale that argues for larger PV systems, there are some benefits of small systems.For starters, small systems are well-suited to rooftops. A typical house, if it has a reasonable orientation, can hold a 4-6 kW solar array, enough to handle a significant fraction of the home’s power consumption (as long as then home is reasonably energy-efficient). And commercial buildings, with large flat roofs can often hold hundreds of kW or even a MW or two of solar — which can provide a significant fraction of those buildings’ electrical demands.Putting solar modules on roofs creates headaches with roof maintenance, and poor-quality installations sometimes result in roof leaks, but rooftop mounting allows us to preserve land area for agriculture, recreation, and wildlife habitat. Whenever possible, I prefer to see PV systems installed on rooftops or carports rather than ground-mounting, though I recognize that that isn’t always possible or practical.Small PV systems also usually generate electricity close to where it is being consumed. Such “distributed power” is changing the face of the utility grid. From a resilience standpoint, generating power close to the point of end-use of electricity also opens up an opportunity for incorporating either some battery storage or specialized inverters with capability to draw power from the solar system even when the grid is down — something that most grid-connected solar systems can’t do today. (For more on that, refer back to my blog, Getting Power From Solar Equipment When the Grid is Down.) The economy of scale with solarAs with wind, there is an economy-of-scale with solar-electric systems. Bulk purchase of solar modules brings the costs down somewhat and, more significantly, larger inverters (the devices that convert direct-current electricity produced by PV modules into the alternating current that can be fed into the utility grid) and other balance-of-system components are a lot less expensive per kW or MW of capacity than the residential-scale components being installed for home systems. RELATED ARTICLES Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. But the differences in cost between large and small systems aren’t nearly as great with PV systems as they are with wind turbines. This means that the incentives for building very large solar systems (“industrial-scale” if you must) aren’t as great as they are with wind. Utility-Scale Wind TurbinesWind Power: Why it Doesn’t Make Sense EverywhereConnecticut Continues Ban on Wind TurbinesWind Farm Sued Over Noise Is big solar bad?Not in my book. As I look toward the future and a growing imperative to dramatically reduce our fossil fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, I’m convinced that we need a mix of facility sizes with renewable energy systems. There will be many places where large, ground-mounted multi-megawatt-scale solar systems make sense, such as along highways and utility corridors where the land is already degraded and agriculture may not be feasible.In arid places with lots of open land, such as the American Southwest, it should be possible for large solar systems to be developed responsibly — as long as enough open space is maintained for wildlife.This isn’t to say that huge arrays make sense everywhere, just as wind turbines don’t belong everywhere. Having served as a trustee of the Vermont Chapter of The Nature Conservancy for nine years, I am well aware of the need for natural, undisturbed habitat.But I’m also aware that if we don’t address our greenhouse gas emissions, we will be doing far more damage to ecosystems than the solar arrays (and wind farms) that are coming under more widespread attack. When the economy-of-scale with wind power [no-glossary]led[/no-glossary] to larger and larger wind turbines, opponents of these installations took to referring to them as “industrial wind power.” Whenever I see a letter-to-the-editor or news story that uses this phrase, I can tell that it’s going to have an anti-wind bias.Whether its marring their views of pristine mountains, blighting their night sky with blinking red lights, causing bird and bat fatalities, or producing the somewhat mythical “infrasound,” opponents almost universally refer to these wind farms using an industrial moniker.So, I’m becoming troubled by recent reference to “industrial solar” in describing the larger photovoltaic (PV) installations that are cropping up in Vermont and nationwide. Some opposition seems to be emerging, for example, to a 2 megawatt (MW) array that’s being proposed for Brattleboro, and I’m hearing more and more such concerns nationally.last_img read more

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Tag: 上海龙凤1314 shlf FTC Censures Facebook, Asks You to Like It… on Facebook

first_imgThe Federal Trade Commission approved a final settlement with Facebook Friday over the social platform’s privacy policies. Way to go FTC, it is about time the government stepped up and scared the pants off these big, reckless technology companies that run ripshod over their users. But, wait. What is this? The FTC carries a big stick and brings the hard questions to Facebook. Then it asks you to like the FTC… on Facebook. The Commission had some tough words for Facebook and will subject the company to third party privacy audits every two years. In the same press release announcing the settlement, the FTC asks you to like it on Facebook. Something doesn’t jive here, does it? dan rowinski Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Tags:#Facebook#Government#web center_img Related Posts The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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