Monthly Archives: January 2021

Month: January 2021 Students compete in summit’s mobile app contest

first_imgStudents interested in mobile apps can satisfy their curiosity at the Notre Dame Mobile Summit 2012, a two-day event held by the University Council of Academic Technologies (UCAT). Junior Yiting Zheng, the campus technology director for Student Government, said the summit features speakers, brainstorming sessions and discussion on Notre Dame’s mobile strategy. Zheng said the Mobile Summit has been in the works since last semester. She said Ron Kraemer, vice president of the University and chairperson for UCAT, wanted students to be very involved in the weekend’s events. “I had the idea of doing a competition among students, and as we discussed, we decided to have a mobile app idea contest,” Zheng said. Zheng said today’s events include discussions on the mobile strategy at Notre Dame. Saturday is geared toward student participation in the mobile app idea contest, she said. Student teams will send in their content today for approval before their presentations. “We have about twenty-eight registered teams right now who will be presenting five minutes each, and then it’s basically a contest to see who has the best idea,” Zheng said. Zheng said students will share their ideas on posters accompanied by descriptions of how the app will function. Highly sophisticated mobile apps are not necessary for the contest. However, some student teams are working on their apps already, she said. Judges and audience will vote to determine the winners. “We have three judges, and then a fourth prize will be decided by an audience vote,” Zheng said. Audience members will be able to text in votes for their favorite competitors on Poll Everywhere, a technology-driven audience response system used by Google and the US Census, she said. Zheng said the contest allows for a wide range of academic fields to join and brainstorm together in one summit. “We have some IT management students, two psychology majors, two science pre-professional students and all sorts of majors.” Zheng said. “It’s not limited to a certain group of students.” The Notre Dame Mobile Summit 2012 will be held from 9:30 to 4 pm today and from 1 to 4 pm on Saturday in the Mendoza College of Business.last_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Panelists discuss local LGBTQ social issues

first_imgA panel of professors discussed the different current events, issues and policies in the LGBTQ community on Monday at Saint Mary’s. The panel was organized by Eileen Cullina, the President of Saint Mary’s College Straight and Gay Alliance (SAGA). Patrick Pierce, professor of political science, proposed ways for gay rights policies to change over time in favor of the LGBTQ community. The public is very involved in these policies and change will happen more and more with generation replacement and awareness to the problem of redistricting, he said. “Older, more culturally conservative people leave the population, [and] younger, more culturally liberal folks enter the political population,” he said. “Nobody will tell you in the media that a big problem has to do with redistricting. “Republicans who are going to hold more culturally conservative positions, more restrictive positions with gay rights policies – they have been controlling state legislatures. They can redraw the district lines for state legislative districts.” Following Pierce, justice education professor Adrienne Lyles Chockley said the LGBTQ community had great successes in the courts in 2013, and even more major issues are being discussed in the state-level courts right now. “Perhaps the biggest success is the movement in gay marriage,” she said. “Here are the main areas [in which] there is some major stuff happening: family law, association and civil participation, equal benefits, public education and crime and punishment.”   Catherine Pittman, clinical psychologist and psychology professor, said there are ways to make change on the city level, raising awareness to rights that LGBTQ individuals.  “The truth is, there are a lot of older people who think it’s already against the law to do things that hurt the LGBT community,” she said. “There is an organization called the South Bend Human Rights Commission … [that is] empowered to fight discrimination on the basis of race, religion, color and family status. “They are not empowered against discrimination against gay or transgender people.” Pittman said the possibility for change exists in the local community, and the South Bend LGBTQ community needed civil rights but struggled to prove that there was a local problem with discrimination. “The opposition would say that people are looking for special rights, and there is no evidence that there’s even a problem,” she said. “After about eight years, we finally got the South Bend City Council to pass a law that says if a person is discriminated against on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity, they are allowed to go to the human rights commission and ask for help if it has to do with employment, public accommodations, education and housing.” Communication studies professor Marne Austin, said interpersonal communicatio  and taking a holistic approach to working through all perspectives articulated is crucial to making shifts in culture. “The jargon and the rhetoric of “coming out” is decades old now, but this idea of coming out of the closet is so grounded in heteronormativity,” she said. “I and several scholars have tried to reclaim the term of “coming out”‘ to “inviting in”.  “We can have interpersonal instances of social justice just by talking to people. we can actually make changes in their lives.” Contact Alaina Anderson at [email protected]last_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Students react to Pinstripe Bowl

first_imgThe announcement that Notre Dame accepted a bid for the New Era Pinstripe Bowl in New York’s Yankee Stadium thrilled Irish fans from the Big Apple but left others comparing the bowl to last year’s BCS National Championship at the Orange Bowl in Miami. “From what I understand, the Pinstripe Bowl is a relatively new thing,” junior Chris Tricarico said. “Obviously, you want the BCS National Championship, but I feel like it’s a pretty prestigious bowl game.” Sophomore Heather Fredrickson said she had made plans to visit New York before the bowl announcement was made Saturday. She said she was “stoked” to have the opportunity to go to the game. “Compared to last year, it’s not the same, but it’s a bowl game and I think it’s definitely where we are,” Fredrickson said. “Definitely colder, but it will also be a good experience.” Sophomore Brian Miller said the bowl’s lack of prominence factored into his decision to stay home in Chicago for the game. He said he would have considered going to the bowl “if it were a more important game.” “I don’t think it’s a humongous deal for Notre Dame,” Miller said. “Probably for other schools, but for a school with expectations like we have, it’s not as big of a deal.” Tricarico, a Long Island native, said he plans to go to the game because he can travel to Yankee Stadium in a little more than an hour. “It’s super easy,” he said. “It’s so close to me that I couldn’t just not go. Honestly, if it were anywhere else, I probably wouldn’t have gone, but now this is giving me an opportunity to see it firsthand.” Sophomore Jack Szigety said he looks forward to incorporating his hometown of Ridgewood, N. J., into his game day experience and welcoming his Notre Dame friends into a part of his life they have never seen before. “The Pinstripe Bowl has provided the opportunity for myself and others from the New York metropolitan area the chance to be at home and close enough to a Notre Dame game, which is something that the students from Chicago get all the time,” Szigety said. “Another great thing is that I have a lot of New York pride and I love the city and the area that I’m from, and the Pinstripe Bowl has given me a chance to both attend and watch a football game as well as entertain my friends who are from different areas who are going to come,” he said. “So I get to show a piece of me off to people who normally wouldn’t have the opportunity to see where I’m from.” The president of the Notre Dame Club of Long Island, John Pennacchio, said the presidents of all the Notre Dame clubs in his region, which includes the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, found out during a previously scheduled regional meeting that Notre Dame accepted the bid. He said they began making plans during the meeting. “We want to show we’re very supportive of Notre Dame out here,” Pennacchio said. “We have a big alumni base out here so we’re very excited, and we want to do as much as we can to welcome Irish fans from across the country to this national game. We want to show the rest of the country that New York is a big Irish supporter.” Andrew Wilson, president of the Notre Dame Club of New York City, said his club was “happy” to welcome Notre Dame back to Yankee Stadium four years after their 2010 matchup with Army. “The Notre Dame Club of New York is excited to be the host Club for the 2013 Pinstripe Bowl,” Wilson said. “New York City is an amazing place, especially, I think, during the holidays. “Even if the temperature is not traditional bowl weather, thousands of alumni and subway alumni in the New York City area are ready to hear the greatest of all university fight songs in the city soon.” Tricarico said Yankee Stadium would add a special significance to the game. “I’ve been a Yankee fan my whole life, so just being in the stadium is going to be an awesome experience,” he said. Sophomore James Elliott said the bowl would be a departure from what he normally sees at Yankee Sstadium. “I’m pretty glad it’s at Yankee Stadium,” Elliott said. “I’ve been there a lot, and it’s kind of cool because I’ve never been there for anything but baseball before.” Students can purchase one or two tickets for $50 each through their student ticket accounts until Wednesday, John Breeden, ticketing associate director in the Athletics Department, said. He said the Athletics Department would not organize a ticket lottery this year. “We feel we have enough supply this year to meet demand,” Breeden said. “This is not always the case. We’re confident we can meet any student demands as long as [their tickets] are ordered by Wednesday.” Contact Lesley Stevenson at [email protected]last_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Saint Mary’s students dance for charity

first_imgFrom noon to midnight Saturday, Dance Marathon hosted its ninth annual fundraiser for Riley Hospital for Children in the Angela Athletic Facility.Senior Dance Marathon co-president Ellen Smith said every cent of the $86,765.70 raised during the 12-hour event benefited the children at Riley in many ways.Junior co-president Kristen Millar said the essence of Dance Marathon is to stand for those who can’t.“Twelve hours represents the hours in a clinical shift, 12 hours in a chemotherapy session and there are 12 different types of pediatric cancer,” Millar said. “Thus standing for those 12 hours is a symbol of perseverance.”Millar said Saint Mary’s is a great place to carry on the tradition of Dance Marathon, raising funds and caring for those impacted by Riley.“Dance Marathon directly gives funds to the hospital but also sends unending love and support to the children and families at Riley,” Smith said.Families who have been impacted by the hospital were invited to speak at the event. Smith said this aspect of the even is a very important tradition.“[The families] remind us why we dance, for those children who can’t,” Smith said.“Saint Mary’s is a unique place in that it is all women, and regardless of time it has remained true to its mission from the [Riley Foundation],” Millar said. “Dance Marathon was started nine years ago by two girls who were profoundly impacted by Riley’s Hospital for Children.“Although Notre Dame is a tremendous school with abundant resources, Saint Mary’s will always be a small school with a big heart.”Millar said the turnout at this year’s event was the best Dance Marathon has had yet.“We had so many people stay the full 12 hours, which was very inspiring,” Millar said.Smith said she hopes Dance Marathon will continue to raise awareness for the hospital in upcoming years“I think it is so important for Saint Mary’s students to participate in Dance Marathon because it gives us all a chance to help others who desperately need and deserve our love and support,” Smith said.Sophomore Public Relations/Dancer Relations Committee Member Katie Morrissette said she fell in love with Dance Marathon her first year and have continue to be involved ever since.“It’s inspiring to see the amount of girls so invested in the cause, especially because many of them haven’t been affected directly, but have been impacted by the Riley stories,” Morrissette said.Morrissette said the event was rewarding, especially at the end when the total amount fundraised was revealed:.“After the 12 hours, when our total was revealed, we could put a number to how much work we’ve done,” Morrissette said. “It’s rewarding knowing all of that is going to families like the ones we interacted with at our own marathon.”Tags: Dance Marathonlast_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Archbishop examines relationship between Catholic Church and Irish society

first_imgSpeaking to a large crowd in the Mendoza College of Business’s Jordan Auditorium on Thursday, Archbishop Charles J. Brown reflected on his mission in serving as the apostolic nuncio to Ireland and the intersection between modern Ireland and the Catholic Church. Titled, “The Catholic Church in Ireland and Pope Francis: Legacy and Transformation,” the lecture was part of the annual Keeley Vatican Lecture series sponsored by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies.Brown, a 1981 Notre Dame graduate, addressed the cultural and spiritual challenges in the Vatican’s relationship with Ireland and his job as the Holy See’s official diplomat to Ireland.“The apostolic nuncio has two roles: to be the pope’s representative to the local Catholic community and to be the pope’s representative to the sovereign government,” he said.Brown said when he arrived in Ireland and assumed his official position in January 2012, he made it his mission to be involved in Ireland’s Catholic community, accepting as many invitations as possible to visit local churches, schools and other important community institutions.“I made it my priority to be open and accessible so that I could learn about the needs of the Church in Ireland,” he said.Brown said the Church’s historical role in Ireland is “daunting in its complexity.”He noted the dichotomy among Christendom, the cultural and social dominance of Christian values and Christianity itself, which he defined as faith in the person of Jesus Christ and his Church. He referenced a famous homily by Archbishop Michael Neary of Tuam, which bemoaned the death of Christendom in modern-day secular Ireland.Brown said the collapse of Christendom, however, is distinct from the state of Christianity in 20th-century Ireland. From the 1930s to the 1960s, he said Mass attendance was high, large numbers of men and women entered religious life and “a Catholic ethos dominated Ireland.”“Ireland’s traditionally rural and agrarian culture with a conservative outlook and widespread opposition to British dominance were both major factors in this,” Brown said.Brown said by the the 1970s, Irish society became more secular. Causes of this transformation included immigration of American-born Irish back to Ireland and the introduction of their more secular lifestyles, as well as the advent of increased electrical usage, which brought the secular values of the media industry to the entire nation.Brown said that the emergence of abuses among the clergy, particularly pedophilia, damaged the Church’s cultural influence.“No matter what the issue is, when a Catholic voice is raised, the inevitable response is that they’re trying to bring back the era of clerical dominance,” he said.Brown said Pope Francis’s messages of freedom and humility in Christ has a broad appeal. He said he has hope for the future of the Church, particularly in Ireland.“There is a palpable desire in the Irish people for meaning beyond the merely material and the physical,” he saidTags: Charles J. Brown, Ireland, Irish Catholic, Irish Catholic Church, Keeley Vatican lecture, The Catholic Church in Ireland and Pope Francis: Legacy and Transformation, Vaticanlast_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Society promotes support of women engineers

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Jillian Montalvo Members of the Society of Women Engineers grill hot dogs and hamburgers before a Notre Dame football game as part of its fundraising efforts.Before entering her senior year of high school, now-college senior Jillian Montalvo attended the Introduction to Engineering Program at Notre Dame. As part of the program, she also attended an event hosted by the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), during which she listened to speakers from the group. When she arrived on campus, Montalvo knew what she wanted to do.“The first thing I did when I came here freshman year was sign up for SWE,” Montalvo said.Over the past year, the group has met on the first Wednesday of every month, discussed future plans and hosted an average of four events per month, Montalvo said. Since Montalvo’s freshman year, membership has grown so substantially that the group has gone from being classified as a medium section, with 50 to 100 members, to a large section. Currently, the Notre Dame chapter, of which Montalvo is now president, has over 200 members and is one of the largest student organizations on campus, Montalvo said.“SWE’s mission is to stimulate women to achieve their full potential as engineers and leaders, expand the images of the engineering profession as a positive force in improving the quality of life and demonstrate the value of diversity,” Montalvo said.SWE has hosted a variety of events in order to achieve this goal, Montalvo said. They played a large part in Engineering Industry Day, a career fair that connects engineering companies with possible engineers for hire, and Early Admit Week, Montalvo said. Much of their work involves South Bend, including Girl Scout Day, where South Bend Girl Scouts are taught about engineering through crafts and other activities, Montalvo said. Profits from several of their events — including This Is Engineering and the Trick-or-SWEet Run — benefit charity, Montalvo said.According to Cathy Pieronek, assistant dean of academic affairs of the College of Engineering and advisor to the society, the Notre Dame chapter started around 1977.“Dr. Jerry Marley, who was assistant dean at the time, wanted to start it. I would guess it was because women were still a fairly recent addition to Notre Dame and a small part of engineering.“We had no women faculty. I would think that he thought it would be important for our women to have access to professional women engineers for role models, inspiration and mentoring.”The most important aspect of SWE is the amazing opportunities it provides for its members, Montalvo said.“It has something for everyone,” Montalvo said. “For first year students, it’s a great source of encouragement and mentoring. We plan several events specifically geared towards first year students to help them decide if engineering is right for them and also, if they do like engineering, which field of engineering they should choose.“It’s also a great place to meet other women in engineering, to make friends and to build relationships on which you might otherwise miss out,” she said. “There’s also the professional development aspect of the society. The biggest part of this, I would say, would be the regional and national conferences that I’ve been able to attend, thanks to SWE.“These conferences offer amazing networking opportunities, and it’s amazing to meet other collegiate and professional members of SWE and to listen to their stories. SWE has been a huge part of my college career.” Photo courtesy of Jillian Montalvo Members of the Society of Women Engineers attend the monthly meetings and discuss the club’s future plans and events.Next year, Katrina Gonzales will take over as president of the SWE, Gonzales said, after having joined the Society her freshman year.“As the next president, I am excited to lead a club of such strong and intelligent individuals — yes, men can join too,” she said.“I hope to continue to shape our section into the club its members want it to be. As president, I also intend to focus on including more outreach efforts to the local area and partnering with other clubs on campus to have a broader impact.“I look forward to working with so many inspired and passionate individuals.”Tags: Coeducation, engineering, Society of Women Engineers, women in engineeringlast_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Mother/daughter duo present on Childhood Apraxia of Speech

first_imgAs part of Support a Belle, Love a Belle (SABLAB) week, the Student Government Association presented two alumnae of the College, Kathy Hennessy and her daughter, Kate Hennessy, on Tuesday, September 7 in Madaleva Hall. They discussed apraxia and the impact it had on their lives, highlighting how we should be aware of diseases that aren’t physically crippling.Kathy Hennessy described childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and the effects it has on children.“Speech is a complex motor task that involves the planning, the programming, and the execution to obtain speech,” she said. “With childhood apraxia of speech, there’s an interruption in the planning and programming of speech. So in other words, there’s a breakdown between the message in the brain, the lips, the tongue, the jaw, the articulator.“CAS is not about weak muscles; it’s not about waiting for a child to outgrow it. It’s not a learning disability, and what we now know is that the vast majority of children who have CAS can be resolved. And there’s not a whole lot of research on CAS, but we are coming to understand that there’s one in 1,000 children who will be diagnosed with CAS.”Before apraxia was diagnosed as a disorder, parents were ill-informed on the matter, Kate Hennessy said.“With this sort of disorder, parents were advised to lower the expectations,” she said. “They were told that their kids would not go to college, wouldn’t talk and in some cases they were told to institutionalize their children.”As a single mother, Kathy Hennessy raised her two children, Kate and Andy, who were both diagnosed with apraxia at young ages. The process of discovering their disorder, however, proved to be difficult due to the lack of knowledge and research on apraxia.“According to the American Speech and Hearing Association, in 2007, they came out with a position statement and a technical report that recognized the childhood apraxia of speech as an actual disorder,” Kathy Hennessy said.Kate Hennessy described her experience growing up with a disorder that made feel different from her friends and the impact that has had on her life.“You know, growing up being different than everyone else and having something that makes you stand apart from your friends and other people in the classroom, it made me all the more compassionate to people who do have differences,” she said. “And it really made me and my brother advocates for not just childhood apraxia of speech.”Through Kathy’s encouragement, the help of therapists and patience, Kate and Andy became more confident in their ability to speak over time. Although they carry a residual affect, they continue to strive in everyday matters. Kate Hennessy successfully works in the film industry across the country, while Andy Hennessy is studying electrical engineering. The Hennessy family promote the awareness of apraxia through talks and through its book, “Anything but Silent.”Kathy Hennessy emphasized the importance of acknowledging non-physical disabilities, particularly in children.“It’s important to realize that not all disabilities can be seen, that there are hidden disabilities and people can suffer and need help but look happy,” she said. “It’s important to reach out. If you think somebody’s in trouble, as well as yourself, and you find help, I don’t think there’s any embarrassment in that.“I think there’s plenty of places on campus to go to or to each other. I think supporting each other is crucial. I think Saint Mary’s is really great with that — the girls support each other so well here.”Tags: CAS, SABLABlast_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Simple assault reported to University

first_imgAn individual reported multiple instances of simple assault to a University administrator Monday, according to Tuesday’s Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) crime log.A simple assault is defined as an instance when “a person knowingly or intentionally touches another person in a rude, insolent or angry manner,” University spokesperson Dennis Brown said in an email.This definition is part of Indiana code, Brown said, and differentiates the crime from other types of assault such as aggravated, domestic or sexual assault or battery. The alleged assault occurred multiple times in a Notre Dame residence hall, according to the log entry. The incident was classified as a Title IX offense in the log, which Brown said was because of who received the initial report.Students did not receive an email from the University alerting them that a report had been filed because the crime was not deemed a timely threat based on the information available at this time, Brown said. This is in accordance with the Clery Act regulations.Tags: Clery Act, NDSP, NDSP crime log, simple assault, Title IXlast_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Naval ROTC hosts charity for Special Olympics

first_imgThe Naval Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) program of Notre Dame will be holding its annual 24 hour run through campus from Friday at 6 p.m. to Saturday at 6 p.m. to raise money for St. Joseph’s County Special Olympics. The event will be held at Fieldhouse Mall.Junior Michael Terranova, president of the Trident Naval Society, said that the event involves midshipmen raising money around campus.“How it works is Midshipmen in the ROTC unit, the Naval ROTC unit, they run in tandem,” Terranova said.  “So, it’s two guys per hour, one-hour shifts, and we go continuously for 24 hours … [We] run around campus collecting donations.”Terranova said the group will keep the navy theme throughout the event.“One midshipman will be dressed in a shark costume and one with a trident,” he said.Since the tradition began, the midshipmen have realized that gamedays provide the best opportunity to raise money on campus because of the increased foot traffic it brings to the area.“We do this every year,” he said. “Last year we raised $4,200, and it’s a really nice gameday tradition that we always do. It’s one game a year, so we chose Stanford because it’s a big game.”Terranova said the event involves as many midshipmen as possible to help bring in more donations.“As far as runners go, there’ll be 48 runners, and then we have everyone in the battalion manning the [donations] booth,” he said. “It’s an all hands evolution. So, it’s pretty big involvement.”To capitalize on this exciting gameday atmosphere, Terranova said that the midshipmen plan to run everywhere and anywhere there are people.“[We go] all over the place,” he said. “The main spots are the Dome, Main Circle, the landmarks, we run up to the tailgates, so you can see us out there.”People who are interested in the cause will also be able to donate to St. Joseph’s County Special Olympics through Paypal.Terranova said Naval ROTC appreciates St. Joseph’s County Special Olympics’ dedication to helping raise the levels of confidence and competitiveness with those who struggle with developmental disabilities through the organizing of sporting events.“[St. Joseph’s County Special Olympics] gives people who aren’t as fortunate the opportunity to express themselves through sport, to be competitive, to do things that we take for granted,” he said. “It’s important to help organizations like that, that give that opportunity to people who don’t necessarily have that given to them through no fault of their own.“We’ve had a pretty good relationship with them over the years,” Terranova said. “They organize a bunch of sporting events for the challenged in South Bend … ROTC is always volunteering at Special Olympic events. It’s important that we give them this money, so they can keep doing … good things.”Tags: 24 hour run, Naval ROTC, st. joseph’s county special olympics, trident naval societylast_img read more

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Month: January 2021 Access-ABLE club advocates for students with disabilities

first_imgFor students with disabilities, tasks like getting to exams on time or to the dining hall on a snowy day can prove to be very difficult. While Notre Dame’s Sara Bea Disability Services aim to “reduce or eliminate the barriers that may be caused by the interaction of a disability and a traditional academic environment,” according to its mission statement, there is still a long way to go to improve disability services on campus. This is why four students at Notre Dame started the now-probationary club, Access-ABLE. The students’ main goal is advocacy and awareness for students with disabilities. President Monica Mesecar, vice president Myriam SagastaPereira, treasurer Michelle Moufawad and secretary Ellie McCarthy — all sophomores — are currently in the final phase of becoming an SAO-official club. Scott Howland, program coordinator of the Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilities, serves as the faculty advisor. For now, the club plans to have regular meetings, where students can speak openly about accessibility, specifically the challenges a student with disabilities faces on a daily basis.McCarthy explained a story about her roommate and club president Mesecar, who has cerebral palsy. Mesecar, who lives in Ryan Hall, one of the only disability-friendly dorms on campus takes her exams in the disability center. After leaving Ryan around 6:30 a.m. last February, the wheels of her motorized wheelchair got stuck in the unplowed snow outside of the Morris Inn. McCarthy had to push her out and walk her the rest of the way to the disability center. McCarthy said this story opened her eyes to concerns about accessibility.“If you’re making Monica come all the way to the disability center, and you’re not sending someone to collect her, how can you ensure her safety?” McCarthy said. “No one else is up at that time in the morning. If I hadn’t woken up to help her, that could have gone a lot worse. It is not only impacting her day-to-day life, but it’s really impacting her education, too.”The Access-ABLE club provides a place for students with disabilities to share stories like these. The group hopes to run a speaker series, bringing differently abled people from around campus to explain their experiences and discuss how other students can help make their days easier.“People have [generally] been inviting and helpful to students with disabilities,” McCarthy said.Still, there is still a lot that needs to be done, she said, specifically in terms of the buildings on campus. Twelve Notre Dame dorms are non-accessible on campus — Badin Hall and Walsh Hall were recently renovated and are now accessible. Even buildings that are accessible are “not always convenient,” Moufawad said, bringing up Riley Hall of Art as an example. There is a ramp that leads into the wood shop in Riley, but students can’t use the ramp when class is in session. “We want to work with the student government and administration [on building renovations],” Moufawad said. “It’s tricky to change all of these buildings and make everything handicap-accessible, so that is more of a long-term goal.” Access-ABLE is already working with student government. One of the items on junior Elizabeth Boyle and sophomore Patrick McGuire’s platform while running their successful campaign to be student body president and vice president was to work with Access-ABLE and expand the club.As a new club, Access-ABLE is planning many strides forward in the upcoming semester. The club just opened up a Facebook page and Instagram account, “Access-ABLE of Notre Dame” and “@ndaccess_able,” respectively. McCarthy encourages students to “keep their eyes and ears open. Try to be helpful, and all in all, if they’re interested, join the club.” Tags: access-ABLE, disabilities, disabilities on campus, Sara Bea Center for Students with Disabilitieslast_img read more

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