Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi

Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Axa Mansard Insurance Plc (MANSAR.ng) 2010 Annual Report

first_imgAxa Mansard Insurance Plc (MANSAR.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2010 annual report.For more information about Axa Mansard Insurance Plc (MANSAR.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Axa Mansard Insurance Plc (MANSAR.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Axa Mansard Insurance Plc (MANSAR.ng)  2010 annual report.Company ProfileAXA Mansard Insurance Plc is an insurance and asset management company in Nigeria. The company offers solution products for motor, life, travel, education and commercial insurance as well as financial advisory services, portfolio and risk management services and investment consulting services. AXA Mansard Insurance Plc’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. AXA Mansard Insurance Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Episcopal seminarians serve as summer chaplains at Hartsfield

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Don PlummerPosted Jun 12, 2014 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books John Andrews says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Rev. Donna Mote and seminarians Cameron Nations, Michael Bordelon and Lisa McIndoo.[Diocese of Atlanta] Three Episcopal seminarians from the School of Theology at Sewanee: The University of the South have begun 10 weeks as chaplains at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.The seminarians are supervised by Episcopal priest the Rev. Donna Mote, a member of the interfaith chaplaincy at the Atlanta airport.  Mote is also assisted by two part-time ordained and one part-time lay chaplain.Mote is one of three full-time chaplains at the airport, augmented by some 50 volunteers representing 10 faiths. The airport, the world’s busiest, serves over 225,000 passengers a day.Atlanta’s Episcopal Bishop Rob Wright, who assigned Mote to the airport, said the Episcopal chaplaincy “is to be an active, visible and positive Episcopal presence at the world’s busiest airport — drawing the circle of inclusion wider, welcoming more people home to the Episcopal Church and representing the church and Christ in the world.” Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (1) Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL June 13, 2014 at 12:43 pm Drawing the circle wider for all peoples and all faiths………..Thanks be to God Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal seminarians serve as summer chaplains at Hartsfield Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Saigon House / a21 studio

first_img Vietnam Projects CopyHouses•Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Area:  45 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/635091/saigon-house-a21studio Clipboard Saigon House / a21 studioSave this projectSaveSaigon House / a21 studio Houses ArchDaily Year:  2015 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/635091/saigon-house-a21studio Clipboard Saigon House / a21 studio Photographs:  Quang TranSave this picture!© Quang TranRecommended ProductsDoorsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Entice Series Entrance SystemDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteWindowsOTTOSTUMM | MOGSWindow Systems – BronzoFinestra B40WindowsJansenWindows – Janisol PrimoText description provided by the architects. Saigon has altered beyond recognition, for us, it is hard to call a development, it is, actually, a sequence of destructions: a destruction of culture, architecture values… and especially, our beautiful memories of Saigon.Save this picture!© Quang TranSaigon house, is a space dedicated to the old Saigon-Gia Dinh, typically “Van Duong” Palace, an architecture masterpiece of a Saigonese, Vuong Hong Sen; however, it has been undermined by human stupidity.Save this picture!© Quang TranSave this picture!DetailSave this picture!© Quang TranSaigon house, moreover, is our love to Saigon’s alleys, which are romantic with its rain and sunshine.Save this picture!© Quang TranProject gallerySee allShow lessPaüls Doctor Surgery / VoraSelected ProjectsGain an International Perspective by Studying Architecture in BarcelonaMisc Share Photographs Architects: a21studio Area Area of this architecture project “COPY” Save this picture!© Quang Tran+ 21 Share “COPY” CopyAbout this officea21studioOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteelConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodHo Chi Minh CityHousesVietnamPublished on May 27, 2015Cite: “Saigon House / a21 studio” 26 May 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogVentilated / Double Skin FacadeTechnowoodClick Façade SystemWindowsMitrexSolar WindowMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownAcousticKvadrat AcousticsAcoustic Panel System in AMOREPACIFIC HeadquartersStonesCosentinoSilestone® Surfaces – Loft SeriesWoodLunawoodThermo Timber and Industrial ThermowoodLightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt PlazaTiles / Mosaic / GresiteLove TilesPorcelain Tiles – NestAluminium CompositesMetawellAluminum Panels for Interior DesignMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Double Lock Standing SeamStoolsWilkhahnOffice Stool – Aline-SBulbs / Spots / Wall LightsUniosHorticultural Luminaire – Kobe FloMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Game day in Fort Worth

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Former Fort Worth, TCU Police Department officer dies of COVID-19 and on-duty injury complications ReddIt printLoading 75%Game day in Fort WorthThe Frogs returned to the Amon G. Carter Stadium amid a pandemic for their home opener against Iowa State.By Renee UmstedFans had to be socially distant in the stands during the TCU football game against Iowa State. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Fans had to be socially distant in the stands during the TCU football game against Iowa State. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Ten months have passed since the Horned Frogs played in the Carter. When the TCU football team lost to the West Virginia Mountaineers, 20-17, last November, everyone expected the Frogs to be back in the Amon G. Carter Stadium by mid-September. But the COVID-19 pandemic brought college athletics — like most everything else — to a halt. Throughout the summer, university officials, fans and the public agonized about whether it was safe for players to suit up. But a season without football would do more than pause old rivalries. At a time when universities were strapped for cash, there were also financial considerations.Chancellor Victor Boschini said in a July town hall meeting that not having fall sports would cost TCU about $40 million.By early August, football was back on, but it was clear the specter of COVID-19 would change the game. First up, Jeremiah Donati, TCU’s director of intercollegiate athletics, said the stadium capacity would be capped around 25% — roughly 12,000 people.The first game against Tennessee Tech on Sept. 12 in Fort Worth was canceled due to the coronavirus. TCU made plans to play SMU instead. But the 100th anniversary of the Battle for the Iron Skillet was also postponed after TCU players tested positive for COVID-19. Instead, fans waited to see a kick off until end of September was just days away. A Saturday game day usually brings crowds to campus. Neighborhood streets are clogged with cars. Tailgating begins hours before tickets are taken. And the restaurants along South University Drive are at capacity.The Frogs lost 37-34 in a season opener unlike any other. With new safety guidelines, limited attendance and changes to game day festivities, fans, players and staff experienced the first TCU football matchup during the pandemic. The Amon G. Carter Stadium (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)The Amon G. Carter Stadium (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Welcome to the CarterA stadium employee monitors the entrance to the field. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)A stadium employee monitors the entrance to the field. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)A girl cheers on the TCU football team along with her family. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)A girl cheers on the TCU football team along with her family. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Iowa State fans watch the football game against TCU. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Iowa State fans watch the football game against TCU. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU football fans maintained social distancing in the stands in the game. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU football fans maintained social distancing in the stands in the game. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU required all visitors to wear masks to enter the stadium.The Frog Alley entrance was stacked with people trying to get through the temperature check.Staff used an automatic infrared scanner to measure, in less than 5 seconds, the temperature of fans entering the stadium.Acknowledging the Texas heat, staff allowed people whose temperature was above 100.2 degrees to stand in front of a fan to see if they truly had a fever or if the high reading was a result of the heat.After passing the temperature check, visitors received a blue wristband to show they had passed and then proceeded to the mobile ticket scan.Forget about barcodes and QR codes; staff members waived scanning devices over fans’ phones to pick up the signal.The process didn’t take long, unless a phone had to be repeatedly scanned because a signal couldn’t be found.  Inside the stadium, there was no sea of purple and white chanting “Go Frogs.” Instead, scattered pockets of fans dispersed sparingly throughout the stadium.One TCU fan said it seemed as if the Frogs were losing by 21 points with no hope to come back. But TCU fans weren’t the only ones missing. At one point, only about 100 Iowa State fans could be counted in the crowd. One Iowa State fan said he came because he lives in the area and wanted to meet up with family, who drove from Oklahoma.No matter who scored, touchdowns weren’t met with the typical stadium-wide eruption of cheers and excitement. Fans for both teams said the quiet and the slow start to the game felt more like a scrimmage than a regular conference game.A wide shot of the limited capacity of the west, east and south sides of the stadium. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)A wide shot of the limited capacity of the west, east and south sides of the stadium. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)Iowa State fans celebrate. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)Iowa State fans celebrate. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston catches a pass for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston catches a pass for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU tries to stop Iowa State from scoring. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU tries to stop Iowa State from scoring. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston approaches the end zone for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston approaches the end zone for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)A wide shot of the limited capacity of the west, east and south sides of the stadium. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)A wide shot of the limited capacity of the west, east and south sides of the stadium. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)Iowa State fans celebrate. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)Iowa State fans celebrate. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston catches a pass for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston catches a pass for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU tries to stop Iowa State from scoring. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU tries to stop Iowa State from scoring. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston approaches the end zone for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU wide receiver Quentin Johnston approaches the end zone for a touchdown. (Connor Cash/Staff Reporter)TCU fans had to be socially distant in the stands during the game against Iowa State. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU fans had to be socially distant in the stands during the game against Iowa State. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Fans inside the stadiumTCU’s spirit squads tried to rouse the crowd.  The 16 Dutchmen led the student section in different chants, including “Go Frogs” and “Riff Ram.” Their main job was to get the students hyped and make sure the energy stayed up throughout the game to cheer on the athletes, said Garrett Weir, the head Dutchman.But getting everyone to participate was difficult since they could not be as loud or stand on the usual ladders, said Liliana Ogden, a member of the Dutchmen.The masks meant for safety muffled their voices.“Wearing the masks were a challenge in the sense of our voices not being able to carry as much,” said Ogden. With the stadium at reduced capacity, the Dutchmen tried to be as loud as possible to support what was happening on the field and keep the energy up. “We’re still going to bring that A-game,” said Weir. “Our job [doesn’t] change–it got twice as important this year.”Ogden said one job of the Dutchmen was to try to maintain the same energy level in a socially distanced stadium that normally comes as people feed off of the excitement of those around them.The student section expanded to accommodate social distancing and other protocols. “The challenges were what we expected with trying to maintain separation in a general free-for-all,” Weir said.He added that the student section is usually a free-for-all. But this season, students have to wear masks and they aren’t supposed to be in groups larger than four.Despite the guidelines in place, some students congregated in groups larger than four, not complying with social distancing rules. And students are not used to following strict rules, but they have to adapt to keep people safe.The Dutchmen followed new protocols as well. They couldn’t stand on their elevated ladders or pass out the game day towels to students.  Instead of towels, the Dutchmen set pom-poms on students’ seats before they arrived to give them something to cheer with.Other TCU spirit groups, including the Showgirls, cheerleaders and band, were not allowed to play or dance on the field. The Showgirls and cheerleaders stayed at the corners of the end zones, while the band was located next to the student section.   Liliana Ogden, a TCU Dutchmen, gets ready for the game by laying down pom-poms on every seat in the student section. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Liliana Ogden, a TCU Dutchmen, gets ready for the game by laying down pom-poms on every seat in the student section. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU students cheer for the football team. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU students cheer for the football team. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU Cheerleaders cheer 6 feet apart during the football game against Iowa State. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU Cheerleaders cheer 6 feet apart during the football game against Iowa State. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)A TCU Band member plays the clarinet through her mask during a TCU Football game. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)A TCU Band member plays the clarinet through her mask during a TCU Football game. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Customers were required to socially distance while standing in the concession lines. (Braden Roux/Staff Reporter)Customers were required to socially distance while standing in the concession lines. (Braden Roux/Staff Reporter)A stadium employee works concessions. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)A stadium employee works concessions. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Fans wait in line to get their food. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Fans wait in line to get their food. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU fans had to stand in designated spots, set 6 feet apart, at the concession stands. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)TCU fans had to stand in designated spots, set 6 feet apart, at the concession stands. (Heesoo Yang/Staff Photographer)Concession lines for the Frogs’ home opener were considerably shorter than usual, given the limited capacity.At halftime, most lines looked as if fans only had to wait about five to seven minutes, and many concession stands didn’t have any lines. “It was nice being able to get food without missing 20 minutes of the game,” said Lauren Mallette, a junior at TCU.Sanitation and safety were the priority of the food service staff. Workers wiped down every surface during any down time they had. According to the TCU Athletic Food Service COVID-19 Adjustments, all staff were required to wear the appropriate PPE, including face coverings, gloves and face shields. Customers in line were encouraged to use cashless payment options. They were required to follow social distancing guidelines and could only take their masks off when eating or drinking. The concession menu was also limited for safety purposes, and beer and other drinks were being served in closed containers. Mallette said she was able to order what she wanted despite a limited menu.Some concession options were closed due to the smaller crowd size, and vendors were not allowed to walk the rows of the stands to sell food and drinks as they usually are. “You could tell that the workers were still adjusting, but I appreciated how quick the service was regardless of the craziness of a COVID game day,” said Mallette. The Amon G. Carter Stadium welcomes students back for a new football season. (Kaitlyn Freetage/Staff Reporter)The Amon G. Carter Stadium welcomes students back for a new football season. (Kaitlyn Freetage/Staff Reporter)Fans outside the stadiumFrog Alley was different this year amid the pandemic. (Matthew Sgroi/Staff Reporter)Frog Alley was different this year amid the pandemic. (Matthew Sgroi/Staff Reporter)The new Frog Alley, located on Stadium Drive, had booths set up with music, games and food. (Matthew Sgroi/Staff Reporter)The new Frog Alley, located on Stadium Drive, had booths set up with music, games and food. (Matthew Sgroi/Staff Reporter)TCU allowed students to request tickets and create groups of up to four people. But not all of those who requested a ticket received one, and many students didn’t submit any requests.For example, Gabbi Struchen, a junior strategic communication major, decided to watch the game with a few friends in her sorority house, skipping large watch parties or off-campus tailgates. “It’ll be fun to get to be together and enjoy it without having the extra worries that come with being around large crowds right now,” Struchen said. Bao-Tram Le, a sophomore biology major, also did not request a ticket because she said watching the game at home would be just as enjoyable and allow her to avoid large gatherings and the new restrictions.“We could still get ready, order pizza and gain the full experience pandemic-style,” Le said. TCU Athletics released a statement last month explaining that tailgating is prohibited in all lots and spaces, “in order to provide the safest environment for fans to enjoy TCU Football this fall.”This lack of tailgating led to a pre-game environment TCU fans aren’t used to. Each lot, usually filled with raucous Horned Frogs fans, was instead filled with empty cars and spaces.To try to make up for the loss of on-campus pregame spirit, TCU Athletics set up the new Frog Alley, located on Stadium Drive. Frog Alley is a family-oriented pregame party/tailgate, where booths are set up for music, games and food. This week, Mexican restaurant Mi Cocina and Rudy’s BBQ set up booths, and even The Coaches’ Trophy, the trophy presented to the CFB National Champion, made a visit to Frog Alley this week. Frog Alley will be continued throughout home games this football season.While tailgating wasn’t allowed on lots surrounding the Carter, that didn’t stop fans from getting their tailgate fix in before the game. Many fans said they participated in off-campus tailgates, which were hosted in neighborhoods close to campus.TCU student David Clary said he got ready for the game at a friend’s house in Bluebonnet Hills. He said they did all the same things they would at a normal tailgate. “We had some burgers on the grill and just had a good time,” Clary said. “It wasn’t the same as being next to the stadium with hundreds of other Frog fans, but it made do under the circumstances.”These off-campus tailgates were very helpful for the business of Kroger. Initially, the store was worried that the lack of tailgating might impact its sales. On a pre-COVID-19 game day, Kroger could expect TCU tailgaters stopping by to run a quick errand, whether it be for burgers, beer or ice. Crista Cook, the store manager, said they plan for football Saturdays the same way they would plan for a holiday.“Anything that you would sell for tailgating, we load up on,” Cook said. She added that though the store expected less traffic than normal, they prepared the same way they have in previous years. The Kroger parking lot was full for the duration of the morning and afternoon.The corner of Lubbock and West Cantey on game day. (Molly Boyce/Staff Reporter)The corner of Lubbock and West Cantey on game day. (Molly Boyce/Staff Reporter)Around campusIn the past, students would park their cars wherever they could on game days, including in neighborhoods close to campus, creating parking issues. Diann Stadler, a TCU alumna who lives on Greene Avenue, said parking used to be “horrible and daunting during TCU home games.”However, due to new COVID-19 rules, parking regulations have been adjusted. “Since the stadium is now only allowing 25% capacity, the parking situation in and around campus is MUCH more bearable,” Stadler said. She added that cars used to block her driveways, so she couldn’t leave her house, but since parking is only allowed on the east side of the street, congestion has been reduced.The same rules in regards to where people can park are still applied. But since the occupancy numbers have decreased, so has the amount of vehicles on campus.The on-campus population is significantly reduced due to COVID-19, so there are not as many people tailgating or attending the games as there has been in the past. A sign prohibits parking near a house on Waits Avenue. (Molly Boyce/Staff Reporter)A sign prohibits parking near a house on Waits Avenue. (Molly Boyce/Staff Reporter)Cars line the the street at the corner of Greene Avenue and West Cantey Street. (Molly Boyce/Staff Reporter)Cars line the the street at the corner of Greene Avenue and West Cantey Street. (Molly Boyce/Staff Reporter)The following staff writers contributed to this report: Haley Cabrera, Connor Cash, Haeven Gibbons, Braden Roux, Matthew Sgroi and Charlotte Tomlinson.TopBuilt with Shorthand Cap and gown shipments delayed, off-color versions handed out for 2020, 2021 graduates ‘Horned Frogs lead the way’: A look at TCU’s ROTC programs + posts Renee is a journalism major. She is dedicated to improving her journalism skills to effectively and ethically inform others. Jacqueline Lambiase is still fighting for students SportsFootballIn-depth reportingTop StoriesGame day in Fort WorthBy Renee Umsted – September 26, 2020 2549 Renee Umsted Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years center_img Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Twitter Previous articlePatterson: ‘No silver lining’ as football drops season opener to Iowa StateNext articleEmergency drills in buildings cut short due to social distancing Renee Umsted Linkedin ReddIt Linkedin Twitter World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Renee Umstedhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/renee-umsted/ TCU will not raise tuition for the 2021-22 academic year TCU 360 staff win awards at the Fall National College Media Convention Facebooklast_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Learning While Leading

first_img Subscribe More Cool Stuff Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Caltech’s student leaders (from left to right): Sunita Darbe, Connor Rosen, and Catherine Jamshidi. Credit: Lance Hayashida/Caltech Marketing and CommunicationsHowever, these students say the juggling act can be a gratifying challenge. We recently spoke with Catherine Jamshidi, Connor Rosen, and Sunita Darbe about their experiences in student leadership, their goals for their organizations, and their time-management strategies.What are your main leadership responsibilities?Darbe: As chair of the Graduate Student Council (GSC), my job is to be the face of the graduate student body when interacting with all of the other parts of Caltech—for example, in working with the undergrads and with all of the various administrative offices and staff offices. I also try to keep an eye on what graduate students are bringing up and try to make sure that those concerns are heard by the appropriate people.Rosen: I’m the chair of the Interhouse Committee (IHC), and the ASCIT vice president for nonacademic affairs. I deal mainly with housing, dining, issues related to how housing placements happen, and any other issues related to where people are living. IHC is also involved in the policies related to those issues, so I also serve as the intermediary between the administration and the students on these policies.Jamshidi: As ASCIT (Associated Students of the California Institute of Technology) president, my first job is to oversee the ASCIT board of directors, which is the student government of the undergraduates. I try to be in touch with what’s going on around campus, what the student body is currently concerned about, and how I can bring those concerns to the relevant administrators or members of the faculty board. Make a comment Top of the News What were your goals when you began your term at the end of the last school year?Darbe: Obviously the technical training at Caltech is awesome, bar none. But we also want to make sure that some of the nontechnical skills—ones that are important for professional development, but don’t necessarily come through the graduate curriculum—are supported by GSC efforts. This year another one of our goals is to support and recruit a diverse student body, and we’ve been very pleased to see support for this at all levels in the administration.Jamshidi: My main goal is to learn about and address what the students care about. I also went into my term expecting to be able to give good direction to the individuals on the board of directors, helping them figure out what they need to be doing in their roles.Rosen: A lot of what the IHC works on are yearly needs that relate to the way the house system functions. The biggest of these is rotation, which is the process by which first years are assigned to a house. When I came in as IHC chair, I set goals for how efficient and effective I wanted the process to be. In the end, I wanted the students to be pleased with both with the process itself and with the outcomes. Rotation was all over and done at the beginning of the school year, and it went very well—I think we improved on the things we wanted to improve on from previous years. 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it What do you think is unique about being a leader at Caltech?Jamshidi: Caltech is so small that I feel like everyone knows me. At a larger school, people wouldn’t know who I am or what I do. Often, administrators will email me random questions like, “Who do I talk to about XYZ?” and I’ll redirect them. That interaction wouldn’t happen at a larger school.Rosen: It also goes the other way. Because Caltech is so small, we are able to have weekly and biweekly meetings with the vice president for student affairs. That just doesn’t happen at other places. Also, I know that my job doesn’t exist elsewhere because the house system is unique. That has its pros and its cons. I love the house system; it’s great to be a part of. But when I’m trying to troubleshoot something, I can’t ask, for example, “What did they do at MIT when something similar to this happened?” because there’s no comparison to be drawn. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * HerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Hollywood Divas Who Fell In Love With WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhy Luxury Fashion Brands Are So ExpensiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeauty Since you are all student leaders, can you tell us what year you are and what you’re studying?Jamshidi: I’m a junior, studying computer science and business, economics, and management.Rosen: I’m a senior majoring in chemistry. I do work on protein degradation in the biology lab of professor Alex Varshavsky.Darbe: I’m a fourth year graduate student in materials science. I work with Harry Atwater on optics for ultrahigh-efficiency solar cells. How will these leadership skills be applicable to your after-graduation plans?Darbe: I’m interested in being a research scientist. It’s not yet clear to me where the most exciting opportunity is going to be, but I think that a lot of these GSC skills are going to be very helpful. Being able to corral people, and motivate people, and run an effective meeting. And, among other things, learning how not to promise too much. So many of these skills will be very, very useful, in years to come.Rosen: I’m applying to biology programs for graduate school right now; I definitely know that I want to stay in research. Just as Sunita said, these roles allow us to peek behind the academic curtain, and if I end up being a professor, I’ll be on the inside. To know how an institution like Caltech runs at more than just the teaching level will be useful.Jamshidi: I think the people skills I’ve gained as a leader will help in the future. My classes have prepared me with scientific and technical knowledge, and my leadership role has helped me develop skills like being able to work with lots of different people and learn how they’re thinking. Those are important skills. It sounds like these roles are time-consuming. How do you fit in time for all of the other things in your lives, like classes, research, athletics, and so on?Jamshidi: I balance it by staying extremely organized. I schedule everything that I do, pretty much always. And if I notice that I’m spending more time on homework, I’ll reschedule everything. I don’t know how else I’d be able to do it.Darbe: I can only do this role by virtue of it being a one-year commitment. It’s a lot of time, but it’s really rewarding, and it’s really cool to see the academic institution from the other side—to sort of peek behind the curtain.Rosen: I’ve always made my position in the IHC a priority. I took this on because I felt it was important, and I had a lot of things I wanted to get done in the position—things that I cared about accomplishing. It is a priority, not only in terms of when I am in class, but also when I sign up for classes. If I know I could be spending 60 hours a week on IHC commitments during a particular term, I’m not going to sign up for 60 hours of classes. For example, during rotation there was one day where I woke up at 8 a.m., went to bed at 1 a.m. the next morning, and only had a lunch break in between. Community News How did you get involved in this leadership role, and what made you want to be a leader?Rosen: I ended up in student government almost by accident. I love the houses, and I was very involved in my house socially, and when someone said that our house needed a president, I said, “I want to do it.” As president of my house, I served on the Interhouse committee for a year before becoming chair. I like being involved because I care about the people, I care about the house, and I want to be here to help students solve their problems, so they can go back to focusing on everything else that life—and Caltech’s coursework—is throwing at them.Jamshidi: I started in student government during the third term of my freshman year. For the first two terms I was here I saw the upperclassmen who were involved, and they seemed to know everything—I wanted to be like them. And my involvement was also partially driven by boredom. I play volleyball during the fall term, and then during winter I had my first break from volleyball in a long time and I was like, “I have so much free time! What do I do now?” So I became the ASCIT secretary and I really enjoyed it.Darbe: I was involved in GSC last year, in the capacity of organizing a professional development conference. When I see something happening and I have opinions about it, I don’t like to let things sit. I like to do something about it. And fortunately, because of its small size, Caltech is an easy place to make things happen. Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Education Learning While Leading Caltech’s student leaders have full plates. In addition to splitting their time among responsibilities in academics, research, athletics, internships, social causes, and many other activities, they have also been elected to serve as representatives of and advocates for their peers. By JESSICA STOLLER-CONRAD Published on Friday, January 9, 2015 | 11:02 am First Heatwave Expected Next Week last_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi State paying €8,000 per return trip to keep Donegal airport open

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp It’s emerged that the state is paying €8,000 per return trip to keep Donegal airport open.The Government has paid a subsidy of more than €8,000 for each passenger return journey in a bid to keep air routes operational between Donegal and Kerry airports and Dublin throughout the Covid-19 pandemic.According to the Irish Independent, the State subsidy in place throughout April for the Donegal-Dublin and Kerry-Dublin routes is now 4,000 % greater per passenger return journey compared to the actual airfare involved. Facebook Homepage BannerNews Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Previous articleDale Gorman to move on from OrientNext articleFunding announced for key Donegal community projects News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img State paying €8,000 per return trip to keep Donegal airport open Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+ WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Twitter By News Highland – June 4, 2020 Google+ Facebooklast_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Prosecutors mull death penalty for alleged Tree of Life synagogue shooter

first_imgBrianAJackson/iStock(PITTSBURGH) — Federal prosecutors in Pittsburgh are now deciding whether or not to seek the death penalty for alleged synagogue shooter Robert Bowers, according to a new court filing.The case against Bowers, who is charged with federal hate crimes including the murder of 11 congregants at the Tree of Life synagogue, returned to court briefly on Tuesday without the defendant present.During the hearing, attorneys referenced a document filed by U.S. Attorney Scott Brady indicating the Justice Department has now begun the process of deciding whether Bowers should be put to death.“Ultimately, the Attorney General will render a decision whether or not to direct that a notice of intent to seek the death penalty be filed,” the filing said.Bowers is charged with 44 separate counts, 32 of which carry the possibility of the death penalty, in connection with the Oct. 27 massacre at the synagogue in Pittsburgh’s Squirrel Hill neighborhood. The Anti-Defamation League called it the “deadliest” anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history.He has pleaded not guilty.According to the indictment, Bowers drove to the synagogue where members of three congregations gathered for Sabbath worship. He entered the building with multiple firearms, including Glock .357 handguns and a Colt AR-15 rifle.While inside, the FBI said that Bowers opened fire, killing and injuring people, as well as injuring multiple public safety officers who responded to the incident.He allegedly made statements indicating his desire to “kill Jews.” Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Foraging zones of the two sibling species of giant petrels in the Indian Ocean throughout the annual cycle: implication for their conservation

first_imgWe studied the year-round distribution and at-sea activity patterns of the sibling species, northern giant petrel Macronectes halli and southern giant petrel M. giganteus. Loggers combining light-based geolocators and immersion sensors were used to provide year-long data on large-scale distribution and activity of both species from the Crozet Islands (46°25’S, 51°51’E) and northern giant petrels from the Kerguelen Islands (49°19’S, 69°15’E) in the southern Indian Ocean. Argos platform transmitter terminals (PTTs) were used to track fine-scale movements of breeding adults and juveniles. Overall, adults remained within the Indian Ocean during and outside the breeding season, whereas juveniles dispersed throughout the Southern Ocean. In accordance with previous studies, differences in adult distribution and behaviour were greater between sexes than species: females dispersed more widely than males and also spent more time sitting on the water, particularly during the winter. Observed differences in distribution have important conservation implications: adults, especially males, overlap to a large extent with longline fisheries for Patagonian toothfish Dissostichus eleginoides in shelf areas within national Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs), whereas adult females and juveniles are more likely to encounter high-sea longline fleets targeting tuna in subtropical waters. The circumpolar wide ranging behavior of naïve juvenile birds makes them particularly susceptible to interaction with a wide range of longline fisheries.last_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi Construction starts on first US Coast Guard OPC

first_img Photo: Illustration: Photo: Eastern Shipbuilding Group View post tag: OPC Construction on the first ship in a new class of US Coast Guard cutters started with a steel cutting ceremony at Eastern Shipbuilding Group’s facilities in Panama City, Florida, on January 7.The steel cutting for offshore patrol cutter (OPC) Argus (WMSM-915) was a significant milestone for the company even after it sustained damage and work interruption due to Hurricane Michael.The cutting of steel will start the fabrication and assembly of the cutter’s hull, and ESG is to complete keel laying of Argus later this year.Additionally, ESG completed the placement of orders for all long lead time materials for the second cutter, Chase (WMSM-916).“Today represents a monumental day and reflects the dedication of our workforce – the ability to overcome and perform even under the most strenuous circumstances and impacts of Hurricane Michael,” Eastern’s president Joey D’Isernia said. “Today’s success is just the beginning of the construction of the OPCs at ESG by our dedicated team of shipbuilders and subcontractors for our customer and partner, the United States Coast Guard. We are excited for what will be a great 2019 for Eastern Shipbuilding Group and Bay County, Florida.”Measuring 360 feet in length and 54 feet in width, with a projected speed of 22 knots, the OPCs are designed to conduct multiple missions in support of the nation’s maritime security and border protection.Also referred to as the Heritage-class, the OPCs will provide a capability bridge between the national security cutter, which patrols the open ocean in the most demanding maritime environments, and the fast response cutter, which serves closer to shore.The cutter design includes the capability of carrying an MH-60R or MH-65 helicopter and three operational over the-horizon small boats.Eastern Shipbuilding Group will construct the OPCs to replace the medium endurance cutters currently in service. The contract includes options for production of up to nine vessels with options for two additional vessels.The Coast Guard plans to acquire a total of 25 OPCs.The first 11 cutters that are set to start deliveries in fiscal year 2021 will be named Argus, Chase, Ingham, Pickering, Rush, Icarus, Active, Diligence, Alert, Vigilant and Reliance. View post tag: USCGC Argus View post tag: Eastern Shipbuilding Group Share this article View post tag: US Coast Guardlast_img read more

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Category: gykfyfoqloyifjyi English Faculty – Adjunct

first_imgDescription*This recruitment is to establish an applicant pool for futurevacancies. Individuals will be contacted as vacanciesoccur.*Olympic College is continuously recruiting English Adjunct Faculty(part-time) to primarily teach composition and research courses atits Bremerton Campus.Olympic College seeks applicants who are dedicated tostudent-centered learning, closing achievement gaps, supportingdiversity and social justice learning opportunities, and who employdata-informed decision making in their instruction.Click the “How to Apply” button for more information.last_img read more

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