Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh

Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh The Disco Biscuits Announce Three-Night 4/20 Run In Philly

first_imgThe Disco Biscuits wrapped up a two-night run in Washington D.C. over the weekend, cementing their role as the pioneers of “jamtronica” to packed rooms at the 9:30 Club and D.C.’s newest venue, The Anthem. Today, the band announces a three-night run at The Fillmore in Philadelphia, PA for a hometown throwdown on April 19, 20, and 21. The “4/20” weekend will see the Disco Biscuits return to the beloved venue since their winter run in February of 2017. Having only opened in October of 2015, The Fillmore is quickly becoming a favorite of the 23 year old band–and is the home to some of their greatest jams.Check out some magic from their 2016 run, including a “Strobelights and Martinis> Air Song> Vassillios> Moshi Fameus” into “Magellan” for the ages, courtesy of the band. Discounted, 3-day tickets are available in the band’s BiscoTix Fan Club presale here. The lottery request period is now open and ends this Wednesday at 5pm ET. Tickets go on sale to the general public this Friday at 10am ET.last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh A learner’s guide to the universe

first_imgTheoretical astrophysicist Avi Loeb has a pretty good idea about how the universe’s first galaxies formed, but he can’t wait to see if his theories are right.Loeb, chair of the Harvard Astronomy Department and the Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science, said a new wave of telescopes expected to come online over the next decade will allow astronomers to look deeper into the universe — and thus farther back in time — than ever before.That new data will test theories about how early stars and galaxies formed, Loeb said. And, he added, it won’t be the worst thing in the world if some of his own theories are proven wrong.“I would be excited if that happens because it means we will have learned something new,” Loeb said. “Human imagination is limited and nature is full of surprises, so we should keep an open mind.”Loeb is helping prepare the next generation of astronomers to interpret the coming flood of data with a new textbook, “The First Galaxies in the Universe,” introduced this month during an event at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). The book, written with Steven Furlanetto, a former Loeb grad student now at the University of California, Los Angeles, is a more technical follow-up to Loeb’s 2010 book, “How Did the First Stars and Galaxies Form?,” which just won the 2013 Chambliss Astronomical Writing Award from the American Astronomical Society.“The next decade is likely to bring a flood of data,” said Loeb, who is also the director of the CfA’s Institute for Theory and Computation.When Loeb arrived at Harvard in 1993, he was one of just a few people in the world thinking about the first stars. The field has since grown and matured, and was recently listed among astronomers’ top research priorities for the next decade.“I started various aspects of this field from scratch,” Loeb said. “Generally speaking, it’s dealing with our cosmic roots.”In an interview in his CfA office, Loeb described current thinking about the earliest stars and galaxies. The Big Bang got it all started some 13.7 billion years ago — an explosion of inconceivable violence resulting in a dense, opaque, high-energy soup too hot even for basic atoms to form. After about 400 thousand years, the rapidly expanding universe cooled enough that atoms — mainly hydrogen, the simplest atom — could form.This early universe was almost but not completely uniform. There were tiny variations in density that allowed gravity to pull particles together until they assembled into a sufficiently compact cloud, ignited, and formed the first stars, much more massive and short-lived than our own sun. Galaxies came next, forming as the stars glowed within massive gas clouds.The several generations of stars since created the heavier elements needed to build Earth — and human beings.With today’s telescopes, astronomers can map just a small fraction of the universe, Loeb said. New projects like the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, the James Webb Space Telescope, and giant ground-based instruments, like the Giant Magellan Telescope (being built in a mountaintop in Chile), will allow astronomers to see much farther away and further back in time than ever before.Loeb likened astrophysicists to archaeologists, because, as archaeologists go deeper into the past by digging deeper into Earth, astronomers can look deeper into the past by peering farther into the universe. That’s because the universe is so vast it takes light billions of years to cross it. The deeper into the universe a telescope can see, the longer ago that light left its celestial sources.“To understand it, we have to go back in time,” Loeb said. “The farther we look, the earlier are the images we can see.”Loeb said the second edition of the book will either be largely the same as the first, meaning current theories were validated by upcoming observations, or need revision. He hopes it needs at least some revision. It would be a boring universe, Loeb said, if all of today’s theories are true.“It’s good that nature surprises us,” Loeb said. “Doing science is a learning experience.”last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh Alex Dalgarno, 87

first_imgAlex Dalgarno was a truly exceptional person and scientist. World renowned, he was widely considered the father of theoretical atomic and molecular astrophysics, a field that continues to thrive.Born in London, a fraternal twin, the last of five children of his parents, Alex described his childhood as happy and contented. He especially enjoyed playing soccer. At the end of his secondary schooling, he was invited to try out for the Tottenham Hotspur Football Club in London. This event morphed into the local legend that he then faced a critical decision about whether to pursue a career as a mathematician or professional footballer. He made the right choice and proceeded to gain a bachelor’s degree in mathematics at University College London, capitalizing on his exceptional mathematical skills and prodigious memory. When Alex was about to graduate, a chance encounter in 1947 with Sir Harrie Massey, future chair of the Physics Department there, persuaded Alex to switch to theoretical physics for his graduate work. He seized upon this opportunity to use mathematics to interpret experimental data and thereby to solve interesting physics problems.Alex completed his doctorate in 1951 and was offered his first professional appointment in Belfast by David, later to become Sir David, Bates.   At about the same time, rocket flights were making direct observations of the physics and chemistry of the upper atmosphere. To understand these data, Alex developed analytical and numerical techniques for calculating results from an array of radiative and collisional processes. Alex’s forays into perturbation theory, applied to the study, for example, of line broadening and the direct calculation of atomic and molecular polarizabilities became enormously fruitful in those years. Much later, in the 1990s, after Bose-Einstein condensates became feasible, Alex’s methods found new utility in understanding the collisional properties of quantum matter at temperatures near absolute zero.After several long stays in the United States, Alex came permanently to Cambridge in 1967, having accepted a joint offer from Harvard as Professor of Astronomy and from the Smithsonian as Senior Scientist at its Astrophysical Observatory, then and still collocated with the Harvard College Observatory. It took little time for his extraordinary abilities to be appreciated. He was appointed Chair of the Department of Astronomy and served from 1971 to 1976, and, overlapping, Acting Director of the Harvard College Observatory from 1971 to 1973, with the last part of that period also as Acting Director of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Alex also played an important role in the selection of George Field as its first director.Nationally, he was recognized by being appointed in 1973 as Editor of the Astrophysical Journal Letters, a post he served with distinction for almost 30 years. He solved the huge number of problems attendant to that position, always rapidly, justly, and fairly; he opined that not only did he learn a lot of astrophysics in this position but that he “learned still more about people.” Alex also could say more in fewer words than anyone we have ever known. He was both extremely brief and very clear in his communications, oral and written, with all colleagues and mentees.In the mid-1980s, Alex was concerned about the disappearance from the nation’s physics departments of atomic and molecular physics. He decided on a cure: the establishment of an institute for atomic and molecular physics that would train the best and the brightest as postdocs who would then populate physics departments and lead to continued vigor in atomic and molecular physics nationwide. He pursued this idea, gaining adherents, including the National Science Foundation, which funded the center here at Harvard. It has flourished now for almost 30 years.Not only his administrative contributions, but his research productivity, too, kept up a torrid pace; he published papers at an astonishing double-digit annual rate for many decades. In total, he published about 750 peer-reviewed scientific articles spanning his career of over six decades. There was hardly a subfield of aeronomy or astronomy to which Alex’s wide-ranging and fertile mind did not make an important contribution. The external world took notice and showered Alex with awards, such as the Davisson-Germer Prize of the American Physical Society in 1980, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1986, the Fleming Medal of the American Geophysical Union in 1995, and the Benjamin Franklin Medal of the Franklin Institute in 2013.Alex was also an enthusiastic and serious athlete for almost all of his life. His passions, after soccer as a youngster, were squash and tennis. Until the Radcliffe athletic center was built, Alex would join a carful of fellow squash players every day at noon and head for the Hemenway gym, where he had a different partner for each day of the week. In the summer, he could usually be found on the Observatory tennis court in the late afternoon. He kept up this pace into his 80s. When puzzled colleagues posed the obvious question—given his enormous administrative load and his deep involvement in research and with students, how could he find time to play so much squash and tennis—his answer was immediate: “I make it my top priority.”Alex’s personal life was more varied. His first marriage to Barbara Kane ended after 10 years; he and his wife had four children, Penelope, Rebecca, Piers, and Fergus, all of whom still live in the United Kingdom. A second marriage, to Emily Dalgarno, in the United States, also ended in divorce. He did have a companion for the last part of his life, Fern Creelan.Alex felt that his true scientific legacy was not his scientific publications, but the more than 100 graduate students and postdocs he had individually nurtured and mentored, who are now mostly very prominent members of the world’s scientific community and furthering the field that absorbed Alex’s passion.The world is unlikely to see the likes of Alex Dalgarno any time soon again.Respectfully submitted,Michael McElroyJames MoranHossein SadeghpourIrwin Shapiro, Chair At a Meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences on Nov. 1, 2016, the following Minute was placed upon the records.last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh Study identifies gene regions associated with sleep duration

first_img What’s another hour of lost sleep? For some, a hazard Research sheds light on body clock and links to mental health and disease Since both shorter- and longer-than-average sleep durations have been associated with health problems, the team conducted separate GWAS for participants who reported either. Those studies identified additional genes not identified in the larger group analysis that contributed to either a longer or shorter sleep duration. The researchers also found shared genetic links between both abnormal sleep durations and factors such as higher levels of body fat, more depression symptoms, and fewer years of schooling, implying negative effects from both too little and too much sleep. In addition, short sleep duration was genetically linked with traits such as insomnia and smoking, while long-duration variants were linked with schizophrenia, Type 2 diabetes, and coronary artery disease.“Finding 78 areas of the genome that influence habitual sleep duration represents a huge leap forward in our understanding of the mechanisms behind why some people need more sleep than others,” said co–lead author Samuel Jones of the University of Exeter Medical School. “As part of a wider body of work, our discoveries have the potential to aid the discovery of new treatments for sleep and sleep-related disorders.”Co–senior and corresponding author Richa Saxena, an associate professor of anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and a member of MGH’s Center for Genomic Medicine, added, “While follow-up studies are required to clarify the functional impact of these variants, the associated genes are known to play a role in brain development and in the transmission of signals between neurons. These findings suggest themes for future investigations of the sleep-wake control centers of the brain that will help us tease apart mechanisms of disordered sleep and help understand each person’s natural set point for refreshing sleep.”Andrew Wood of the University of Exeter Medical School is co-lead author of the Nature Communications paper, and Michael Weedon, University of Exeter, and Martin Rutter, University of Manchester, are co-senior authors.Support for the study includes National Institutes of Health grants R01 DK107859 and R01 DK102696, and an MGH Research Scholar Award. A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified another 76 gene regions associated with sleep duration. The study, by a team that recently reported finding gene sites associated with insomnia risk and chronotype (the tendency to be an early riser or a “night owl”), has been published in Nature Communications.“While we spend about a third of our life asleep, we have little knowledge of the specific genes and pathways that regulate the amount of sleep people get,” said Hassan Saeed Dashti of the MGH Center for Genomic Medicine, co-lead author of the report. “Our study suggests that many of the genes important for sleep in animal models may also influence sleep in humans, and opens the door to better understanding of the function and regulation of sleep.”It is understood that regularly getting adequate sleep — seven to eight hours per night — is important to health, and both insufficient sleep (six or fewer hours) and excessive sleep (nine hours or more) have been linked to significant health problems. Family studies have suggested that 10 to 40 percent of the variation in sleep duration may be inherited, and previous genetic studies have associated variants in two gene regions with sleep duration.The current study is the largest of its kind to address sleep duration. It analyzed genetic data from more than 446,000 participants in the UK Biobank who self-reported the amount of sleep they typically received. That genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified 78 gene regions — including the two previously identified — as associated with sleep duration. While carrying a single gene variant influenced the average amount of sleep by only a minute, participants carrying the largest number of duration-increasing variants reported an average of 22 more minutes of sleep, compared with those with the fewest, which is comparable to other well-recognized factors that influence sleep duration.To confirm the accuracy of findings based on self-reported sleep duration, the researchers tested the 78 duration-associated variants in a subgroup of participants who had worn motion-detecting devices called accelerometers for up to a week, allowing researchers to associate duration-related variants with factors such as sleep efficiency, instances of waking during the night, and daytime inactivity.Only two of the gene regions identified in this study overlap with those identified in the group’s previous studies of insomnia and chronotype. The sites identified in this study showed consistent effects with a previous GWAS of more than 47,000 adults but limited consistency with another GWAS of sleep duration among more than 10,500 children and adolescents, which supports research suggesting that the genetics of sleep duration may be different in children than in adults. Countering college’s culture of sleeplessness Early birds may be happier than night owlscenter_img As daylight saving time looms, researcher sheds light on health effects of not getting enough rest Related The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Class of 2022 first to be asked to take interactive, online sleep course designed by Harvard faculty last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh Faculty Council meeting — Nov. 13, 2019

first_imgOn Nov. 13 the Faculty Council approved the Harvard Summer School course list for 2020 and heard a proposal regarding the Semitic Museum.The Council next meets on Dec. 11. The next meeting of the Faculty is on Dec. 3. The preliminary deadline for the Feb. 4 meeting of the Faculty is Jan. 21 at noon.last_img

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh A call for Vermonters’ photo and video submissions

first_imgThe Vermont Foliage Force, a task force of Vermont state, business and non-profit entities working to restore Vermont fall tourism, is asking businesses and individuals to share images of their Vermont today, in real-time. The task force is requesting unedited and authentic portrayals of our towns, roadways and scenery that can be used in their fall foliage marketing campaign.Vermonters can share their favorite leaf-peeping routes via video or upload scenic photos on www.vermontpartners.com(link is external). These images and stories will be used to share the vibrancy of our state events, resiliency and character in a See Vermont Like a Local campaign directed by the Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing.‘This is an opportunity for Vermonters to serve as ambassadors of their towns, to support their neighbors and local businesses,’ said Steve Cook, deputy commissioner of tourism. ‘True locals’ tips and authentic images illustrate that we are open for business and that, without exception, our foliage season is going to be spectacular.’  Even in areas unaffected or quickly recovering, post-Irene reports have resulted in cancellations of tours and travel plans that have rendered tourist-dependent businesses idle. The Vermont Foliage Force is working to inform travelers that Vermont is still, and perhaps now more than ever, host to the most inspirational fall foliage experience.With the interstates and 85 percent of the state’s roads fully open, visitors can have the authentic Vermont foliage experience that Vermont is so very proud to provide.Visitors can support Vermont by keeping their travel plans; Vermonters can best support their state by helping communicate that we are open, the scenery is stunning as always, and yes, you can get here from there.A prime example of businesses collaborating to share the message that Vermont is moving forward is the series of first-person accounts the Vermont Chamber has collected: http://www.youtube.com/vermontchamber(link is external).Composed of representatives from the Vermont Chamber of Commerce, Vermont Ski Areas Association, Vermont Agency of Transportation, Vermont Department of Forest Parks and Recreation, Vermont-based communications firms HMC2 and Hen House Media and state tourism officials, the Vermont Foliage Force will use a comprehensive communications campaign to highlight the accessibility of Vermont and that most areas of Vermont are ready to provide the inspirational foliage experience the state is known for.###last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh Olympic Bluegrass: Jay Panther

first_imgLike every skier on the U.S. Ski Team, Jay Panther is hoping to earn a spot on the Olympic team for a shot at gold in Sochi this winter. Unlike anyone else on the ski team, Panther is from Kentucky, spent a year training at the Snowflex slope at Liberty University in Virginia, and is 29 years old—retirement age for most pro skiers. And yet, Panther is a favorite to land one of only three spots on the U.S. Freestyle Mogul Team. We talked with the Kentuckian after a water jump session at the Utah Olympic Park about growing up in the South, his shot at the Olympics, and skiing on plastic snow.BRO: So you spent the summer hanging out in the pool?Panther: Yeah. Freestyle moguls is a combo of ski turns and air. Every trick has a degree of difficulty to it, and a lot of the overall impression comes from air, so we spend a lot of time working on our tricks on water ramps. I spent this summer training at the Utah Olympic Park. It’s a ski jump covered in plastic grass, the Snowflex material. You jump into a huge pool with an air compressor that softens the surface before you hit. It allows us to develop tricks with less of a risk of injury. Usually, I spend my summers playing volleyball.BRO: Volleyball?Panther: I’m a two-sport athlete. I play professional sand volleyball from April to September, but I’m taking a full year of ski training leading up to the Olympics.BRO: Tell us about the Olympic team process.Panther: The Olympic team is chosen the third week in January. There are six World Cup competitions between November and the Olympics. Those results are used to pick the Olympic team. There are probably three slots for freestyle moguls.BRO: How is a boy from Kentucky getting a shot at the Olympic ski team?Panther: I remember lying in bed my senior year in high school, watching Jonny Moseley in the 2002 Olympics. I had butterflies in my stomach watching him compete. A year later, I went to Vanderbilt on a full scholarship to play baseball. During a physical, the doctor discovered that I no longer had a compressed vertebra. My body corrected itself. My first thought was maybe I could go skiing again. Later, I asked my dad what he thought of me leaving school and baseball to pursue skiing, and he told me to go for it. My fourth season back I made the U.S. Development team, then I was skiing World Cup events a year later.BRO: The compressed vertebra wasn’t your only serious injury. Didn’t you also suffer a brain injury recently?Panther: I suffered a really bad concussion in the fall of 2011 while training at Liberty University. I spent the next six weeks on the couch on total bed rest. I ended up winning the U.S. Team selection events that season and earned World Cup starts, but at the second World Cup, I was dizzy. My dreams were at my fingertips, but I knew my head wasn’t well. I ended up dealing with concussion symptoms for eight months. I played volleyball that season basically dizzy. My brain was well, but my injury was so severe, my body hadn’t rewired itself. For a year, my job was to rehab. It was tough. Cognitively, I wasn’t the same person. I was a shell of myself. My memory was gone. I couldn’t make new memories.BRO: And now?Panther: Now I’m healthier than before my concussion.BRO: You mentioned Liberty. What was it like training at that facility?Panther: Liberty’s Snowflex is a ton of fun. They sponsored me for a year. Liberty is still the only place in North America with that kind of facility. Most of the pros will still spend their summers in Mount Hood or in Chile, but there are some amazing skiers coming out of that facility.BRO: Are you the only person on the ski team from Kentucky?Panther: Definitely. But there are some aerialists from Ohio. There’s a water ramp facility there that produces some good aerialists. The ski team is reaching out all over the country to try to get new athletes into the program, including gymnasts and motocross athletes. I’m sure you’ll see skiers from all over the country on the Olympic team soon.BRO: You’re 29 years old. How old are the guys you’re competing with?Panther: Younger. There are kids on the team that are 17 years old. There’s a theory going around that I might be the oldest person ever to make the U.S. ski team. But I feel like I’m 20, so I’m not worried.BRO: How do you like your chances of making the Olympics?Panther: I feel like I have an awesome chance. But if you asked the top 50-100 athletes in every sport, they all think they have a great chance. But this is the most training I’ve had ever. I’m healthy. Things are coming together. Now it’s just a matter of putting it down when it counts. I don’t believe in pressure, but there are some high opportunity moments in the next few months.last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh Moriches Crash Leaves Driver Dead

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 31-year-old Mastic Beach man was killed when he crashed his SUV in Moriches early Thursday morning.Suffolk County police said Daniel Krehl was driving a Saturn Vue eastbound on Montauk Highway when his vehicle struck the rear of a tractor trailer that was parked with its hazard lights near the corner of Fanning Landing Road at 2:37 a.m.The victim was pronounced dead at the scene.Seventh Squad detectives impounded the Saturn, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on the crash to call them at 631-852-8752.last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh CFPB proposed mortgage disclosure rules get mixed grades from credit union trades

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit union trade groups said Monday they got some—but not all–of what they wanted in the CFPB’s proposed updated mortgage disclosure rules.The bureau on Thursday proposed amendments to federal mortgage disclosure requirements under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act and the Truth in Lending Act. The proposed amendments, the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosures, give regulatory backing to guidance that the CFPB has issued. The bureau also proposed tolerance provisions for the total number of payments an adjustment to a partial exemption that affects housing finance agencies and nonprofits, extension of coverage of the integrated disclosure requirements to all cooperative units, and guidance on sharing the disclosures with various parties involved in the mortgage origination process. continue reading »last_img read more

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Category: tmmswymppfqmnruh Activists march in Binghamton in response to law enforcement proposals

first_imgActivists shared their experiences with the criminal justice system, growing up as a person of color and made speeches condemning the proposals made by the departments. The proposals include making resisting arrest as Class D felony, and limiting the ability for citizens to approach an officer who is performing his or her duty. “They’re trying to remove citizens’ ability to record police’s bad actions,” said Alexis Pleus, Executive Director of Truth Pharm. “Imagine that no citizen would be able to come within 25 feet of an officer while he’s engaged in his duty, that’s outrageous.” BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Dozens of people gathered at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. statue in downtown Binghamton on Sunday for a march in response to recent legislative proposals made by local sheriff’s departments. Activists argued that governments should be focusing on improving mental health resources and fighting police brutality rather than increasing protections for police officers. Truth Pharm, Justice and Unity for the Southern Tier, Binghamton Progressive Leaders of Tomorrow and Citizen Action teamed up for the march which ended at the Broome County Courthouse. 12 News reached out to the Broome County Sheriff’s Office for a comment. We have not yet heard back.last_img read more

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