Monthly Archives: August 2019

Month: August 2019 Home NewsWatch Voter Registration Group Aims To

first_imgHome NewsWatch Voter Registration Group Aims To Help Citizens Ahead Of Primaries Next PostThousands Turn Out For The Sweetest Event Of The Year As Lewisburg Hosts Their Chocolate Festival Facebook Terell Bailey Bio Coming Soon Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Website NewsWatchTop Stories Voter Registration Group Aims To Help Citizens Ahead Of Primaries By Terell BaileyApr 14, 2018, 19:59 pm 475 0 Linkedin Twittercenter_img Pinterest Tumblr Google+ Mail Previous PostLewisburg Farmer’s Market Season Opening LEWISBURG.,WV (WOAY) – With Lewisburg being packed with citizens from the Chocolate Festival, several volunteers used the time as a way to make sure everyone is registered to vote.April 17th marks the cut-off date for citizens to register to vote. Volunteers today held a Voter Drive in the Greenbrier Valley Mall for anyone who is of voting age as a chance to check their registration status and also register to vote.Throughout the drive volunteers reminded voters that their are some other tips you need to know besides your registration status.Registration Volunteer Gregg Wingo adds, “Make sure you know what IDs you need to have there’s a series of IDs some are pictured some are none pictured.” He continued , “You can have someone vouch for you and you have to have one of those options an if not for the first time in West Virginia you will not be able to vote.”The primaries will be taking place in May, for those who are unsure about your voting status click here.last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Previous PostWVU Tech Celebrates 13th Annual Camp

first_img Previous PostWVU Tech Celebrates 13th Annual Camp Stem Pinterest WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump has signed an executive order to keep families together at the southern border, saying at the White House that he doesn’t like the sight of children being separated from their families.He said, “We are keeping families together.”But the president added the “zero tolerance” policy will continue.Vice President Mike Pence added that they are calling upon Congress to change the laws. Trump adds that the word “compassion” comes into it.Trump has been trying to win over congressional support on immigration amid a crisis along the border involving the separation of immigrant children from their families. Facebook Google+ Tumblr Linkedin Home NewsWatch National News Trump signs executive order to keep families together, says zero tolerance continues Twitter Next PostCity Of Beckley Offering Reward Leading To The Arrest Of Vandalism Of New River Park Pool National NewsNewsWatchPolitical NewsTop Stories Trump signs executive order to keep families together, says zero tolerance continues By Tyler BarkerJun 20, 2018, 15:43 pm 464 0 Mail Tyler Barker Tyler Barker is currently the Interim News Director and Digital Content Manager for WOAY-TV. I was promoted to this job in Mid-November. I still will fill in on weather from time to time. Follow me on Facebook and Twitter @wxtylerb. Have any news tips or weather questions? Email me at tbarker@woay.comlast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Linkedin

first_img Linkedin Facebook Twitter SportsSports News HS Softball/Baseball Scoreboard – May 2 By Matt DigbyMay 03, 2018, 00:52 am 598 0 SOFTBALLFayetteville 8, Valley 6 (Class A Region 3 Section 1, video highlights above)Midland Trail 12, Webster County 3 (Class A Region 3 Section 1, video highlights above)Westside 4, Liberty 0 (Class AA Region 3 Section 1)River View 5, PikeView 4 (Class AA Region 3 Section 2)James Monroe 12, Bluefield 8 (Class AA Region 3 Section 2)BASEBALLOak Hill 7, Fayetteville 6 (completion of April 10 game)Oak Hill 14, Fayetteville 13Independence 10, PikeView 0Greenbrier West 14, Midland Trail 9Wyoming East 13, Summers County 1Shady Spring 4, Greenbrier East 1Valley 10, Richwood 8Bluefield 6, Princeton 4Liberty 7, Westside 6 Next PostBrooke Daniels Signs With WVU Tech Matt Digby Matt Digby is the Sports Director at WOAY-TV. He joined the station in January 2015 – right in the middle of Big Atlantic Classic Week. Read More Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *Comment Name * Email * Websitecenter_img Pinterest Home Sports News Sports HS Softball/Baseball Scoreboard – May 2 Previous PostMudslide In Bluefield Causes Road Closures Mail Google+ Tumblrlast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Linkedin

first_img Linkedin Charleston, WV (WOAY) – The Wyoming East Lady Warriors are State Runner-Ups for the second straight season after losing to Fairmont Senior in the Class-AA State Championship 51-39.It was a great season for the Lady Warriors who finished the regular season 22-3. The Warriors defeated Bridgeport 53-21 and Wayne 54-29 to make it to the title game.The Lady Warriors Seniors made it to the state championship game three of their four years winning a state championship over Fairmont Senior in 2016.The Lady Warriors will say goodbye to starters Katie Daniels, Jazz Blankenship, Emily Saunders, and Brooke Russell next year as they are all seniors.Congratulations to the Wyoming East Lady Warriors on the successful season. Home Sports News Sports Wyoming East State Runner-Up for Second Straight Year Google+ Facebook Twitter SportsSports News Wyoming East State Runner-Up for Second Straight Year By Nolan KnightMar 10, 2019, 00:09 am 604 0 Tumblr Next PostClass AAA Semi-Finals: Greenbrier East vs. University Mail Nolan Knight Pinterest Previous PostGov. Justice has terminated the employment of Tom Smith, Secretary of Transportationlast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 A Sunday night wreck on Jack Warner Parkway Northe

first_imgA Sunday night wreck on Jack Warner Parkway Northeast claimed the life of a Tuscaloosa senior citizen.Two vehicles were involved, a Chevrolet Sliverado and a Freightliner.The driver of the Freightliner, a 36 year old man, was not injured.The driver of the Chevrolet, 86 year old Woodie Sanders, was trapped in his vehicle and later pronounceddead at the scene. .if the name Woodie Sanders sounds familiar to you, it probably is.Fruits, vegetables, peanuts, whatever was in season, Woodie Sanders was selling it beneath the Alberta Bridge on University Boulevard.Since his tragic death, Mr. Sanders’ signature spot is vacant, only a bouquet of black balloons and a wooden cross stand in his place. Folks began sharing their memories of sanders on our our facebook page and haven’t stopped. He held a special place in the Alberta community.“He was just a staple,” Tuscaloosa City Councilman Kip Tyner said about his longtime friend. Also he was one of the absolute nicest, most gentle men I’ve ever known. He was so kind, and loved what he was doing and his customers as much as they loved him.”Tyner says Sanders has been selling produce in the area for at least 20 years.last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 TweetPinShare0 Shares

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares IRVINE, California — Nathan Adrian led all the way to win the 100-meter freestyle at the U.S. national championships on Aug. 6, with Michael Phelps finishing next-to-last in a star-studded field.Adrian touched in 48.31 seconds. Ryan Lochte was second in 48.96 swimming in the far outside lane. Jimmy Feigen finished third in 48.98.Phelps was last at the turn and straggled home in 49.17, beating only Seth Stubblefield. It was Phelps’ worst showing since beginning a comeback in April.Conor Dwyer took fourth, joining the top three on the U.S. team for the Pan Pacific championships later this month in Australia. “That group of eight guys is much faster than what we showed,” Adrian said.Phelps is facing his toughest competition yet three months after returning to the pool. The most decorated Olympian in history has three other events in which to qualify for Pan Pacs.Adrian and Phelps swam next to each other. After the race they chatted, with Phelps saying, “Man, I missed the wall.” Adrian replied, “Good thing you’re the best swimmer of all time. You’re going to get on the team.”The men’s 100 final featured seven Olympians, including five who have won individual gold medals.“It’s insane the quality of swimmer it took to make the top eight,” Adrian said. “There were even some medalists outside the top eight. It’s never easy to make a U.S. team no matter who you are or where you’re at in your career.”In the women’s 100 freestyle, Missy Franklin surged over the last lap to win in 53.43. Simone Manuel, the quickest qualifier in morning preliminaries with a career-best time, finished second in 53.66 while Shannon Vreeland was third in 54.14.Olympic champion Katie Ledecky earned her third straight national title in the 800 freestyle. Cierra Runge was second in 8:24.69 and 16-year-old open-water national champion Becca Mann finished third in 8:26.64.(BETH HARRIS, AP Sports Writer)last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 ATHENS — Jimmy Durmaz lifted Olympiacos spirits a

first_imgATHENS — Jimmy Durmaz lifted Olympiacos’ spirits after a Champions’ League loss last week, scoring one goal and setting up another to lead the Greek champions to a 3-1 win at Xanthi on Sept. 22.The result extended the club’s perfect record after four matches and came days after a 3-0 home defeat to Bayern Munich.Durmaz blasted the ball past goalkeeper Cennamo Luigi in the 42nd minute, as the hosts struggled to contain the 26-year-old Swede.Nikolay Dimitrov leveled after the break, but Durmaz continued to threaten and was brought down in the area by Dimos Baxevanidis.Kostas Fortounis converted the penalty in the 64th minute and added the third four minutes later.In other games, Veroia was held at Panaitolikos 1-1, while Iraklis also settled for a draw, 0-0 against Platanias.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 ATHENS AP — Croatia qualified for the 2018 World

first_imgATHENS (AP) — Croatia qualified for the 2018 World Cup finals after a 0-0 draw in the second leg of the playoffs against Greece on Sunday.With a considerable advantage from Thursday’s 4-1 victory in Zagreb, Croatia easily held off the Greek hosts as they pressed for an upset.Croatia came closest to scoring in the 42nd minute when Ivan Perisic’s powerful shot ricocheted off Greece’s left post, with goalkeeper Orestis Karezis well beaten.Greece came closest to scoring in the 87th when Panagiotis Tachtsidis’s shot from inside the area was deflected by goalkeeper Danijel Subasic’s legs.Greece also had two shots go just wide – one by Sokratis Papastathopoulos in the first half and another by Costas Mitroglou in the second – but otherwise did not threaten.Croatia coach Zlatko Lakic, who took over the team on Oct. 7, downplayed his own role in qualification.Greece’s Yannis Gianniotas, left, walks in front of Croatia’s players who celebrate their team’s qualification to the World Cup after the end of the World Cup qualifying play-off second leg soccer match between Greece and Croatia at Georgios Karaiskakis stadium, in Piraeus port, near Athens, Sunday Nov. 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)DEMETRIS NELLAS, Associated Press“We have many quality players. I did not have to make much of an effort,” Lakic said. “I should remind you there was a coach before me and what is happening now is the result of a joint effort.”Lakic replaced Ante Cacic, who was fired the day after a home draw against Finland and two days before the last group-stage qualifier at Ukraine, which Croatia won in Lakic’s debut.Greece coach Michael Skibbe said the first leg had done the damage.“We had 12 good games (at the qualifiers) … on this level of football, it is not allowed to make mistakes like these,” said Skibbe, referring to Greece’s poor performance in Croatia. Skibbe said Greece had been unlucky to miss defender Costas Manolas through suspension, and others through injury.It is the third time that Croatia has qualified for the World Cup finals through playoffs after also advancing this way to the 1998 and 2014 tournaments. Croatia has never lost in the playoffs, including two qualifications for the European Championship.Greece’s Sokratis Papastathopoulos, center, controls the ball during the World Cup qualifying play-off second leg soccer match between Greece and Croatia at Georgios Karaiskakis stadium, in Piraeus port, near Athens, Sunday Nov. 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 LOS ANGELES AP — Dozens of GreekAmerican fans w

first_imgLOS ANGELES (AP) — Dozens of Greek-American fans were on hand at the Staples Center in Los Angeles to greet the “Greek Freak” Giannis Antetokounmpo.Antetokounmpo was the subject of a segment on “60 Minutes” on Sunday. Interviewer Steve Kroft traveled to Greece to visit the gym where Antetokounmpo and his brother honed their basketball skills and explained how his parents emigrated from Nigeria.“I loved it. It talked about me, talked about my family,” Antetokounmpo said. “It talked about where I came from and the most important thing, it talked about how someone’s got to work to succeed in life.”THE GAMEThe Clippers came out attacking, moving the ball and hitting 3-pointers to start the game. Then they got stagnant.It nearly cost them.They blew a 16-point, first-half lead and rallied from five down on a slew of 3s in the fourth to beat the Milwaukee Bucks 105-98 on Tuesday night and boost their playoff hopes.Tobias Harris scored 19 points, DeAndre Jordan had 12 points and 16 rebounds, and Lou Williams added 16 points off the bench.The Clippers hit six 3-pointers in the fourth, when they launched a 13-0 run to go back in front 96-88.They made 3-pointers on four straight possessions — by four different players — for a 105-96 lead.“Those really hurt,” Bucks coach Joe Prunty said.Los Angeles trails Minnesota by 1 ½ games for the eighth and final Western Conference berth with eight games to play.“We’re focused right now as much as I’ve ever seen,” said Austin Rivers, who scored 10 of his 13 points in the fourth. “We look at each game like it’s the last game. We don’t have too much room for error.”Milos Teodosic got their 3-point run going in the first quarter, when he made four of the Clippers’ seven 3-pointers. He left the game just before halftime after tweaking his left foot, which has been bothered by plantar fasciitis this season.“I know he was kicking (expletive),” Jordan said.Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 26 points and Khris Middleton added 22 for the Bucks, who opened a four-game Western Conference swing by having their two-game winning streak snapped.The Clippers came out strongly to start the second quarter, extending their lead to 16 on a dunk by Williams.But Middleton and the Bucks chipped away, outscoring the Clippers 26-15 in the third and getting stops on defense. Antetokounmpo had 10 points to help send Milwaukee into the fourth leading 82-78.“We just played defense,” he said. “When we are able to do that we’re really good.”The Bucks ended the third on a 9-0 run, including back-to-back baskets by Tyler Zeller that gave them their first lead since the initial basket of the game.Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)TIP-INBucks: Backup C Thon Maker sat out with a right groin strain. … Green Bay quarterback Aaron Rodgers attended.Clippers: They have won five of seven against the Bucks, including 127-120 last week. … F Danilo Gallinari (right hand contusion, non-displaced fracture) could return Friday at Portland or Sunday against Indiana. He’s missed 17 games with the latest in a string of injuries this season.HE SAID IT“When you have a nickname and Freak is at the end of it, you’re probably pretty good.” — Doc Rivers on Antetokounmpo.UP NEXTBucks: Visit Golden State on Thursday. They lost to the Warriors 108-94 at home on Jan. 12.Clippers: Visit Phoenix on Wednesday in the second game of a back-to-back, their last one of the season. They are 3-7 on the road in the second game.—By BETH HARRIS , AP Sports WriterGreek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)Greek-Americans Welcome Giannis the “Greek Freak” in Los Angeles Game vs Clippers. (Photo by TNH staff)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Sometimes 11yearold B comes home from school in

first_imgSometimes 11-year-old B. comes home from school in tears. Maybe she was taunted about her weight that day, called “ugly.” Or her so-called friends blocked her on their phones. Some nights she is too anxious to sleep alone and climbs into her mother’s bed. It’s just the two of them at home, ever since her father was deported back to West Africa when she was a toddler.B.’s mood has improved lately, though, thanks to a new set of skills she is learning at school. (We’re using only first initials to protect students’ privacy.) Cresthaven Elementary School in Silver Spring, Md., is one of growing number of schools offering kids training in how to manage emotions, handle stress and improve interpersonal relationships.At Cresthaven, some fifth-graders like B. get an intensive 12 weeks of such training, a course called the Resilience Builder Program. Created by psychologist Mary Alvord, it’s a form of group therapy designed to help students who are struggling with trauma or cognitive disorders — or everyday anxiety caused by things like bullying or moving schools..”I think it’s so critical that kids know they have the power to make changes. While we can’t control everything about our lives, we can control many facets,” Alvord says.If students can learn this kind of resilience, the ability to adapt to emotional challenges, she says, “I think the whole world gets better.”The idea of teaching social and emotional skills in school is more than 20 years old. Research has shown this kind of intervention is effective and has a lasting impact. One analysis published last year in the journal Child Development reviewed dozens of programs with similar approaches. Participants were 11 percent more likely to graduate from college and less likely to have mental health problems or be arrested than were students who never went through these programs.In Australia, Canada and the U.K., social and emotional learning in schools is already being implemented on a large scale. Here in the U.S. it has spread, but not as quickly as some would hope. With all the mandates that schools have to keep up with, social emotional learning gets moved to the back burner.But at Cresthaven, the school counselor, Marina Sklias, and the school principal were hungry for it.Sklias says getting help for students dealing with trauma and emotional problems has been tough. In a high-poverty school such as Cresthaven, with a lot of immigrant families, she says there is only so much she can do.”Oftentimes I refer students for counseling and parents request counseling, but due to financial situations or transportation issues, parents can’t always follow through,” she says. At school, she is already stretched thin meeting with students or giving classroom presentations.When Alvord offered to bring the Resilience Builder Program to Cresthaven pro bono as part of a research project, Sklias selected a group of students she thought could benefit from it. It has been used especially with students dealing with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or anxiety or trauma — officially, students with “social competence deficits.” She met with parents, and many agreed to sign up their kids.The program focuses on fifth-graders, Alvord explains, to prepare them for middle school, where pressures like dealing with sex or substance use really kick in. It’s a time that can be especially hard for kids already struggling with social and emotional issues.”It’s a big transition, big change,” Alvord says.For 12 weeks, small groups of Cresthaven students learned about topics like leadership skills, stress management, problem-solving, and empathy. The emotional-problem solving techniques they learned were based in cognitive behavioral therapy — adapted for kids.They also drew on the whiteboard together, did role-playing and yoga, had snack time, and played lots of charades.”I was thinking we’ll just sit and just do work,” B. says. “Instead we would play games and do things that were fun and do things that you usually don’t do in regular class.”Some of the time they worked on simple social skills, like making eye contact during conversation, greeting people in the morning, respecting personal space.The kids also learned handy techniques for working with negative thoughts, like visualizing a special kind of remote control. Alvord shows a drawing with buttons that say things like “happy place” and “things thankful for.””You can switch channels in your head,” she explains. “Instead of ‘that math test was really hard,’ if we think, ‘I got through it and I’m proud myself.’ “Alvord developed the Resilience Builder Program in her private practice decades ago, and now she is working with researchers including Dr. Brendan Rich at Catholic University to measure how well the program works in schools with underserved students. Early pilot studies on the program show it is effective.For kids with ADHD, parents and teachers reported that after the program, students were more social, were able to handle their emotions, and weren’t as hyperactive as before. Parents also reported that kids with anxiety were able to manage their emotions and seemed less depressed.The new research compares students who have done the program with those who haven’t. Researchers have collected data from 119 kids at four schools in the Washington, D.C., area, including those at Cresthaven. They just had a paper accepted by the International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, which found that students who went through the program reported better emotional control than students who hadn’t. They plan to publish more in the coming months, and Alvord is excited by some early results that show the program is helping kids academically.”It all goes together,” she says. “If you’re not struggling with relationships or teasing and bullying, you have more head space to give to study, and you’re also just more positive.”After each Resilience Builder Program wraps up, Alvord organizes a showcase for the students and their parents. The kids get to share what they’ve learned and get certificates of achievement, and their parents cheer them on.On a warm spring evening, the handful of Cresthaven fifth-graders who had just finished the program gathered in the school library for their showcase.Most of the families are immigrants from all over the globe, East Africa, Latin America. Alvord is first generation herself and grew up speaking Russian and Armenian. She tells these families that they already know about how important and hard it can be to adapt.”You have had to make many changes and learn languages and customs — that’s resilience,” she says. There are nods of agreement in the room.The students take turns coming up to the front to get their certificates and share their favorite takeaways.When it’s her turn, B. — the 11-year-old who was being bullied — says that she learned how to solve “friendship problems.””It helped me not get as mad at my friends as I used to,” she says.B.’s mother is thrilled with the changes she has seen in her daughter. Her eyes well up as she talks about how proud she is. B. seems less nervous; she doesn’t come home in tears as often.B. is pleased, too. She especially likes the relaxation skills they learned — things like breathing in and then slowly out again, and clenching fists and then letting go. She can take her new set of problem-solving tools with her to middle school next year and beyond.Your Turn: Share Your Parenting StoryParents make mistakes. It comes with the job. What do you wish you had known about raising kids before becoming a parent?Read this post for inspiration, then share your story on Instagram or Twitter using the hashtag #HowToRaiseAHuman. We are collecting stories until June 30. We may feature your post on NPR. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Faced with a flood of addicted inmates and challen

first_imgFaced with a flood of addicted inmates and challenged by lawsuits, America’s county jails are struggling to adjust to an opioid health crisis that has turned many of the jails into their area’s largest drug treatment centers.In an effort to get a handle on the problem, more jails are adding some form of medication-assisted treatment, or MAT, to help inmates safely detox from opioids and stay clean behind bars and after release.But there are deep concerns about potential abuse of the treatment drugs, as well as worries about the efficacy and costs of programs that jails just weren’t designed or built for.”It was never traditionally the function of jail to be a treatment provider, nor to be the primary provider of detoxification in the country — which is what they have become,” says Andrew Klein, the senior criminal justice research scientist with the company Advocates for Human Potential, which advises on jail and prison substance abuse treatment programs across the U.S. “So, with the opioid epidemic, jails are scrambling to catch up.”A “critical situation”The National Sheriffs’ Association estimates that at least half to two-thirds of today’s jail population has a drug abuse or dependence problem. Some counties say the number is even higher.”We are in a critical situation,” says Peter Koutoujian, a leading voice on the issue and the sheriff of Middlesex County, Mass. — one of the states hardest hit by the opioid epidemic.”We have to physically, medically detox about 40% of our population as they come in off the street,” he says, “and probably 80 to 90% of our population inside has some type of drug or alcohol dependence.”Koutoujian, who is also vice president of the Major County Sheriffs of America, says how best to treat opioid-addicted inmates is among the most pressing issues facing jails today.”We have not been able to get our hands around it because, quite honestly, society has not gotten its hand around either preventing [drug-addicted] people from coming into our institutions or supporting them once they get back outside,” he says.”The fact is you shouldn’t have to come to jail to get good [treatment] programming,” says Koutoujian. “You should be able to get that in your own community so you don’t have to have your life disrupted by becoming incarcerated.”An ever-growing number of jails — 85 percent of which are run by local sheriffs — are trying to expand the use of medication-assisted addiction treatment behind bars, including the use of buprenorphine and methadone, among other drugs.”Dead addicts don’t recover”Jails in states hardest hit by opioids — including Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Rhode Island and Massachusetts — are moving fastest to expand this use of medicine, which is now widely considered the most effective method of treating opioid use disorder. The National Sheriffs’ Association recently put out a detailed best practices guide to jail-based medication-assisted treatment, in conjunction with the National Commission on Correctional Health Care.”Dead addicts don’t recover. So this is our opportunity to engage this population,” says Carlos Morales the director of correctional health services for California’s San Mateo County, just south of San Francisco.Morales is working to expand access to medications for an older model of drug treatment that has long relied on abstinence and a “cold turkey” approach.”We know if you are an opiate user you come in here, you detox, and you go out — it’s a 40 percent chance of OD-ing,” Morales says. “And we have the potential to do something about it.”Felipe Chavez, who’s doing time at the San Mateo jail for selling fentanyl, is taking part in the jail’s fledgling opioid treatment program. Chavez says opioids have ruled his life since he started using oxycodone pills at age 12, following an injury.”I was smoking them,” Chavez says. “Then I went to heroin. Then heroin went to fentanyl.”With his sleepy eyes and loose-fitting clothes, Chavez looks younger than his 23 years – a little like a teenager in baggy pajamas. But the bright hunter-orange of everything he’s wearing, down to the plastic Crocs, all signify he’s in the San Mateo County jail’s infirmary in Redwood City, Calif., where he gets his regular dose of methadone.Still, Chavez is one of the lucky ones here. Because he was in a local methadone program before he got arrested — again — he has been allowed to keep using that synthetic opioid substitute in jail. Methadone and a couple other drugs help jailed opioid users like Chavez temper cravings and, in theory, stay off more powerful and destructive opioids.”It’s all about if you want to get clean or not, you know,” Chavez says. “The methadone is just there to help, you know. I mean, you’ve got to dedicate to the methadone. Because you got to start somewhere.”With the methadone treatment he says, “I just feel more normal — like a normal person.”Jail as an “opportunity to intervene”Doctors who treat people in jails say a challenge — and an opportunity — in expanding the use of methadone or another medical treatment is that it’s not clear, at first at least, how big a role opioid addiction is playing in an inmate’s troubles; their drug use is often intertwined with mental health problems.”The opiate part of the problem is usually not part of the charging documents, so it’s hard to tell,” says Dr. Robert Spencer, San Mateo County’s correctional health medical director. Addiction, mental health and crime “are so intimately connected,” Spencer says. “It’s often a form of self-medication, an attempt by them to modify their symptoms. This gives us an opportunity to provide an intervention and a possible way forward.”More research is needed to confirm the long-term benefits of treating addiction in jail, addiction specialists say. But, so far, studies have shown that medication-assisted treatment works well in reducing fatal overdoses, relapse and in reducing the spread of infectious diseases, such as HIV.Still, this kind of medication-based approach is relatively new in San Mateo — as it is for many jails across the country. For nearly a quarter century, San Mateo’s flagship addiction treatment program has been an abstinence-based approach called Choices. So far, only a dozen or so of the jails’ roughly 1,000 inmates are undergoing some sort of medication-assisted treatment.Correctional health director Morales wants to expand those numbers. But he has lingering worries about costs, effectiveness and safety. He says inmates can hoard — and then sell, trade or abuse — some of the opioid treatment drugs, which are among the most top contraband items in jails today.In addition, prison reforms in California to reduce overcrowding and reclassify some sentences has resulted in county jails housing more inmates for longer periods.That, Morales says, has increased a kind of recidivist merry-go-round: a growing number of inmates with multiple bookings and short jail stays; people who aren’t getting the treatment they often need.”I don’t think our script is good yet,” he says. “We don’t explain it well [to inmates], and we have to get better at advocating that someone use medicated-assisted treatment — and to get the protocol right, so that it’s not isolated folks that are doing it.”Jails need to build the momentum of routine treatment by getting staff and inmates who have been helped talking about the success of this approach, he says. “And frankly, we’re not scaled up enough. Those are the challenges that we’re facing.”It’s a similar story nationally, where the number of jails offering medication for inmates who are addicted is small.Only 10% to 12% of the nation’s 4,000 jails are trying some form of addiction medication as part of treatment.”Although this number is not the majority of jails, five years ago it was zero,” says Klein. “And the number is increasing every week.”Some are offering access to the opioid substitute drugs buprenorphine and methadone, which can help opioid users detox and then temper cravings. Long term, in theory, those drugs can help people who have become addicted to opioids stay off of destructive and potentially deadly street versions.But the majority of jail-based medication-assisted treatment programs today are limited to injectable naltrexone, given upon an inmate’s release.Also known by its brand name Vivitrol, naltrexone is an injectable drug that could trigger withdrawal symptoms in someone who is physically dependent on opioids; but it also blocks the brain’s receptors for opioids and alcohol for 28 days.Inmates who have been addicted to opioids are at far greater risk for overdose upon release, as their tolerance for street drugs is often greatly reduced after a stint of abstinence. Suddenly, a dose that got them high in the old days could now be fatal.Liability concerns and the need to improve withdrawal management are also driving the increase in medication-assisted treatment. About 80%. of all detoxification for drugs and alcohol happen in jails and prisons. And nationally, in the last 10 years, counties and states have paid out well over $70 million for addiction withdrawal-related deaths of inmates, according to a tally by Klein. More than 50 similar lawsuits are still pending.Klein says the challenge is far broader than jails for a public health system that has yet to catch up to the opioid crisis. “MAT is totally underutilized in the community, much less in jails,” he says.The problem is particularly hard for jails in more rural and semi-rural counties, which often have limited access to medications, to physicians who will administer it, and to follow-up programs that inmates can tap into upon release.To provide methadone, for example, a jail has to either be certified as a methadone clinic or partner with a community clinic.”Even if [rural jails] wanted to provide medication-assisted treatment within the jails, there may not be a methadone clinic for 60 miles,” says Carrie Hill, director of the National Sheriffs’ Association’s center for jail operations. “It’s a huge issue.”Or a county may not have a doctor with the necessary licenses to provide treatment medications, Hill says.Most rural areas “don’t have a single doctor who is certified to even prescribe buprenorphine,” says Klein. “So it’s very difficult for a jail to even find a doctor who can prescribe it to an inmate who may need it. Most rural and suburban counties in this country don’t have any methadone clinics they can rely on.”Hill says the sheriffs in her group are working on ways to expand treatment and recovery support services to rural areas, including city-rural treatment partnerships; additional funding to greatly expand telemedicine and broadband services; and mobile anti-opioid addiction units that could deliver treatment drugs to hard-to-reach jails.The group is in conversation with its federal partners to get the necessary medical waivers to do that.Advocates for expanding MAT say the medications are saving lives. “In jail, [when] we have somebody stabilized — off street drugs — they can begin to calm down and [we can] find out if we can help them with medication,” Klein says. “What a tragedy if we miss that moment.”The legislature in Massachusetts, with Koutoujian’s encouragement, has given the green light for a seven-county pilot program of the best evidence-based opioid treatment in jails. Starting this August, the jails will offer all forms of medication-assisted treatment and carefully track data on efficacy — including rates of drug relapse, overdose and recidivism.While he supports MAT in general, Koutoujian, the sheriff, says he’s wary that medications alone will solve the inmate addiction treatment problem. That kind of thinking, he says, got us into this crisis in the first place.”Medication-assisted treatment is very important but people have to remember if you do the medication without the treatment portion — the counseling and the supports — it will fail. And we will just fall prey to another easy solution that just simply does not work.””We have to make sure, if we are going to use medication-assisted treatment,” Koutoujian says, “that when they leave our facility they will have access to medication. Do they have health insurance to cover that medication? Do they have access to counseling and treatment services and navigators to help them through this most difficult time period? If they don’t have that, then in many ways we could be setting them up for greater failure.”Meanwhile, in San Mateo’s jail, inmate Felipe Chavez says he wants to serve his time, reconnect with an infant daughter he barely knows and try “to live a different life.””I mean, I know everyone says that while they’re in here,” Chavez says. “But, you know, I’m really trying to just get my family back together. Change the way of life.”To do that, Chavez says, for now he wants to stay in the jail’s fledgling medication-assisted treatment program — to help him stay off fentanyl and stay alive. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Last updated on July 2nd 2019 at 0907 pmWisconsi

first_imgLast updated on July 2nd, 2019 at 09:07 pmWisconsin companies have paid an additional $139 million on imports since the Trump administration began increasing tariffs on steel, aluminum and Chinese goods, according to estimates from a group advocating against the measures.Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, which held a town hall earlier this year at Waukesha-based Husco International to draw attention to the issue, estimated Wisconsin companies paid $65 million in tariffs in October. The group, a joint effort of Americans for Free Trade and Farmers for Free Trade, says the October data is more than 10 times the amount paid in October 2017.“This data shows that tariffs have been an unmitigated failure in achieving any of the administration’s goals,” said Charles Boustany, a former Republican congressman from Louisiana and a spokesman for Tariffs Hurt the Heartland. “All that’s happening is businesses and consumers are paying more, American exports subject to retaliation are rapidly declining and the deficit the administration cares so much about is ballooning.” The Trump administration has used tariffs against Chinese goods as part of a broader effort to prompt negotiations over the economic relationship between the two countries. Those efforts have led to a 90-day pause in any new tariffs, but broader issues like intellectual property theft have not been addressed.“As we have said since the beginning of the year, we understand what President Trump is trying to accomplish,” said Kurt Bauer, president and chief executive officer of Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce. “We believe that steps need to be taken to ensure free, but also fair and reciprocal, trade with our partners across the globe. However, it is clear that U.S.-imposed and retaliatory tariffs have had an impact on our economy.”Bauer said in the latest WMC economic survey, one-third of respondents said tariffs had a negative impact on their business and just 5 percent said the tariffs are a positive.“It is obvious these policies are making many goods in Wisconsin more expensive to produce, which could have a slowing effect on our future economic growth,” Bauer said.Tariffs Hurt the Heartland says Wisconsin exports have been subject to $71 million in retaliatory tariffs. In October alone, the state’s exports of goods subject to retaliation dropped by 30 percent.Through October, total exports to China from Wisconsin have decreased 5.5 percent, a drop of almost $80 million, according to U.S. Census data. In the first five months of the year, exports were up 8.4 percent, but since implementation of tariffs started in June, exports have decreased 15.6 percent.Wisconsin exports to all countries are up about 1.7 percent during the first 10 months of the year, compared to an increase of 8.9 percent nationwide.Exports from metro Milwaukee are performing slightly better, up 2.4 percent through the end of September. Total U.S. exports were up 9.1 percent over that period.The state’s imports, meanwhile, have outpaced the nation, increasing 13.7 percent through October. Nationally, the value of imports is up 9.6 percent.Read more economic data reports from the BizTracker page. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 George and Julie Mosher in their home on Milwaukee

first_imgGeorge and Julie Mosher in their home on Milwaukee’s lakefront.Milwaukee’s George Mosher, the founder of National Business Furniture, and a prolific networker and angel investor, has died after a battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 79.George and Julie Mosher in their home on Milwaukee’s lakefront in 2016. (PHOTO: Paul Gaertner)Having founded and grown business furniture retailer National Business Furniture LLC to $130 million in revenue, George and his wife Julie sold the company in 2006 to German firm TAKKT for $85 million.George met Julie in Milwaukee, and they were married on Dec. 31, 1966. The couple had three children, Karen, Holly and Robert. Julie passed away in August 2017.A Boston native, George attended Harvard University for both his undergraduate and business degrees. He went to work for Look Magazine in New York for two years before getting an offer in 1963 to take over a small mail order company called Business and Institutional Furniture Co. in East Troy. He grew it to $8 million in revenue by 1975, and then he and Julie started their own company, National Business Furniture, which eventually acquired B&I and is now based in West Allis. After he exited NBF, George took an office in downtown Milwaukee and began mentoring entrepreneurs and investing in early-stage Wisconsin companies through angel groups Silicon Pastures and Golden Angels Investors.He invested about $30 million in 240 companies from 2006 to 2016. Among his most successful investments were BuySeasons.com and Prodesse. George was also one of eight inaugural founders of Brightstar Wisconsin Foundation, a venture philanthropy firm to which each founder donated $500,000.The Moshers have also generously donated to several organizations about which they feel passionate, including the transplant program at Wauwatosa’s Froedtert Hospital, where Julie had a 2008 lung transplant.In a 2016 cover story about the Moshers when BizTimes Media gave them its Lifetime Achievement Award, George said he was in a position to give back after his successes. Click here to see their acceptance speech at the 2016 BizExpo.“A lot of people my age have decided to move to Florida,” George said at the time. “I feel like I earned my money in Wisconsin. I don’t mind paying my taxes in Wisconsin. Wisconsin is home.”More recently, George was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer, but continued to attend business networking events in Milwaukee.Friends and colleagues praised George’s intelligence and business acumen Friday.Roger Dirksen, a good friend who worked at what was then Heritage Bank, loaned the Moshers $50,000 against their Whitefish Bay home, which they needed to get National Business Furniture off the ground.“For the last 12 years, I’ve been meeting with him once a week to talk about his early stage investments,” Dirksen said. “He’s made more than 200 investments in early stage companies, mostly in Wisconsin. We’ve had enough mature successfully that he was ahead, but he will be missed substantially in that community.”But it wasn’t about making a return, Dirksen said.“He had made his money in Wisconsin and he wanted to help other young people do what he did, which was to start a business and grow it and make it successful,” he said.Teresa Esser, managing director of Silicon Pastures, said George wasn’t one to give up on a company if he felt it could succeed. And he would stick around to do that, even in a Wisconsin February.“He was an original member of Silicon Pastures, so he was an anchor for our group,” Esser said. “He was an anchor for a lot of the deals that we did and he believed in angel investing and he gave people chances. He gave me the chance to learn the business, so he set an example through his behavior, through his investing. He believed in a lot of people and he gave a lot of people their chances.”Dave Erne, Mosher’s longtime attorney and friend, recently compiled a list of “Mosher Moments” he remembered about George through the years. One of the moments Erne recalled:“When my new son-in-law, Brian, was starting out as an agent for a local underwriter of commercial property, casualty and workers’ compensation insurance, I imposed upon friends and clients to do me the favor (similar to ones I had often done for them) of meeting him, not with the expectation that they would change to Brian from their current agent, but instead to help him get his feet on the ground and gain experience talking to business people and begin to make some connections in the business community. To my embarrassment, some of these friends and clients did immediately give their business to Brian, and none were quicker to do so than George. When I thanked him, George said he was happy to do so since both the products and the agents are fungible. I regarded this as an unexpected but appreciated favor, nonetheless. George is a loyal friend.”Peter Skanavis, who knew George for 18 years as part of Silicon Pastures and Golden Angels, described him as “one of the most genuine human beings that I’ve ever met,” who remembered details about people months later. He relayed a story of a due diligence meeting among several Silicon Pastures investors in about 2002, when George had to leave early to get back to NBF. George stood up, pointed to Skanavis and said: “If he’s in, I’m in for $100,000.”“George did probably the most deals of any angel investor in Wisconsin,” Skanavis said. “I’m sure nobody else has even come close.”“George was the greatest single angel investor in the history of the state of Wisconsin. I had lunch with him recently, and he told me he had made more than 250 early stage investments,” said John Torinus, chairman of Serigraph Inc. and a general partner at Wisconsin Super Angel Fund L.P. “He was an entrepreneur himself, so he understood people who had the juice to start a company. He mentored them and he put his money behind them. He was a big player in markedly improving the Wisconsin entrepreneurial ecosystem.”Dan Steininger, president of BizStarts, said Mosher has been a mentor and friend since 2006.“I really didn’t know small businesses until George taught me, and he was fabulous,” Steininger said. “He’s been a friend ever since for more than a decade.”Before he passed away, George worked with Steininger to set up a scholarship fund for minority and low-income entrepreneurs at BizStarts. George himself put in $15,000, Steininger said, and several other prominent Wisconsin leaders have also contributed. The fund is up to $41,000 in just three weeks, and Steininger said it will be distributed to BizStarts entrepreneurs in varying amounts on a case-by-case basis.“We’re getting clobbered with people wanting to donate, because they want to do something for George,” Steininger said. “We’re really creating a lot of momentum to create this fund in his honor so that George can continue to help entrepreneurs in the years to come.”Scale Up Milwaukee hosted a “Meet the Masters” program featuring George Mosher in 2015, where he described his career. The video is below.Visitation will be held on Monday, Feb. 4 at 10 a.m. at The Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, 812 N. Jackson St. in Milwaukee. A memorial service will follow at 11 a.m., with a reception to follow at noon at the University Club of Milwaukee, 924 E. Wells St. Arrangements are being handled by Feerick Funeral Home. Click here for the official obituary.In lieu of flowers, the family asked that memorials in George’s name be sent to:Froedtert Hospital Foundation Attn: Office of Development 9200 W. Wisconsin Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53226BizStarts Attn: George Mosher Scholarship Fund 1555 N. River Center Drive Suite 210 Milwaukee, WI 53212 Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Souheil Badran of Northwestern Mutual spoke with M

first_imgSouheil Badran of Northwestern Mutual spoke with Matt Cordio of 5 Lakes Forum and Skills Pipeline.Last updated on June 26th, 2019 at 04:31 pmInvestors and startup founders from across the Midwest converged on downtown Milwaukee Tuesday for the inaugural 5 Lakes Forum at Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co.Matt Gorniak of G2 Crowd spoke with Jim Emling of SilentBoost Consulting.The regional entrepreneurship conference was put on by the Milwaukee Institute and Startup Wisconsin. Among the themes of several fireside chats was Milwaukee’s role in the Great Lakes technology ecosystem, with many expressing optimism about its position and its future.Matt Gorniak, co-founder and chief revenue officer at Chicago-based peer-to-peer business solutions review platform G2 Crowd, said when he started companies earlier in his career, the question from potential California investors was when he would move his company to California. “In ’05, ’06, ’07, you had to defend yourself. Well, Chicago, believe it or not, was not considered a good place for a company. Now it’s like, that’s smart, you guys are in Chicago, Milwaukee, wherever. Smart, good people, good talent pool,” he said.The Midwest isn’t tech heaven, so recruiting a Stanford engineer experienced in data science could be a tough sell, Gorniak said.“But that’s ok; you don’t need them…I think the Midwest is full of amazing people. So I think a lot more companies will be coming here,” he said.Thomas “Rock” Mackie of UW Health spoke with Becky Lang of Discover Magazine.“My company, TomoTherapy, it’s owned by Accuray now and Accuray gave me the data on where they get (subcontracted parts) from,” said Thomas “Rock” Mackie, chief innovation officer at UW Health and co-founder of TomoTherapy, HealthMyne and Geometrics. “About one-third comes from Dane County, but two-thirds comes from the four counties around Milwaukee…so clearly having success in one part of the state’s going to help the whole state. And it turns out that Milwaukee is really a major hub. Even though they don’t have, necessarily, products that consumers understand, but the suppliers of Milwaukee are world famous.”He said Milwaukee should be proud of suppliers like MPE Inc., which supplies medical carts to a broad national range of medical technology companies. A lot of the medical technology activity in the area was spawned by GE Healthcare’s large presence in the market.“More and more, I think Milwaukee’s going to be known as a hub, a source for medical technologies, as well as medicine,” Mackie said.Asked whether he sees the Great Lakes as the next U.S. technology hub, Souheil Badran, chief innovation officer at Northwestern Mutual, said: Yes.“It’s a matter of look what we did from a water perspective,” Badran said. “Milwaukee’s the water tech capital, at least in the U.S. There’s absolutely no reason why we can’t do this from a tech perspective. We’ve got great universities…we’ve got great opportunities from being able to keep people here and move people actually from both East Coast and West Coast…. But I also think about where are we taking action to really make a point at home.”STEM outreach in schools is one key to creating a tech hub, Badran said.“I think the downfall is we haven’t had the big bang. The big bang that says, ‘Hey, Google acquired company X in Milwaukee or Madison or somewhere else. And I think that would really put us on the map….”Another hurdle Wisconsin must clear is gaining more venture capital investors, said Erik Iverson, managing director of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation.“I think what the state is missing is the A Round level of investments. I think there’s a lot of angels and very good angels in the state,” Iverson said.View a photo gallery of 5 Lakes Forum here. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Lisa Reardon president CEO and chairman of Owner

first_imgLisa Reardon, president, CEO and chairman of OwnersEdge Inc.Last updated on July 2nd, 2019 at 09:18 pmOwnersEdge Inc. today announced it has acquired two Maple Grove, Minnesota-based companies: Rhino Communication Rentals LLC and Infinity Wireless Inc.Rhino designs and distributes rental communications solutions for film and production, outdoor events and construction. Sister company Infinity designs and deploys Motorola communication systems for utility companies, manufacturers and hotels. Both were established in 1998 by spouses Dave and Michelle Toutloff. Dave, Michelle and their two children will continue to be involved with Rhino and Infinity. The companies’ existing offices will remain open, and all of its employees will be retained, said Rob Dillon, executive vice president of OwnersEdge.OwnersEdge is an $85 million umbrella firm that now has more than 300 employees among five portfolio companies: Baycom Inc., CC&N, QComp Technologies, TourGuide Solutions and now Rhino. Infinity will merge into Baycom. All of Rhino and Inifinity’s employees were retained in the transactions, and have joined the OwnersEdge employee stock ownership plan. These transactions, both of which were completed May 1, are OwnersEdge’s first outside Wisconsin.“As we looked at each of the businesses, Baycom was particularly scalable because we’re not necessarily constrained by geographic territories,” Dillon said.Baycom has been supplying Panasonic rugged laptops and in-car video systems for public safety and utility customers in the Minneapolis market for a couple of years already, he said, but this is Baycom’s first foray into the rental market.OwnersEdge has made several acquisitions and divestitures over the past few years, and president and chief executive officer Lisa Reardon said the goal is to grow to eight portfolio companies.“We believe that Rhino has significant growth potential and adds a synergistic communications business to our portfolio,” Reardon said. “Merging Infinity into Baycom gives us a brick-and-mortar location to serve our existing Baycom clients in Minnesota and allows us to introduce new products and services to clients Infinity currently works with.”In addition, OwnersEdge has moved its headquarters from Brookfield to Pewaukee as it expands. The new headquarters is located at N16 W23217 Stone Ridge Drive, Suite 250, in the City of Pewaukee, and 11 employees have moved there. Its portfolio companies CC&N and TourGuide Solutions and four employees continue to be based at the Brookfield location, 3325 Gateway Road. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Also you can help us by collecting your spare cha

first_imgAlso, you can help us by collecting your spare change over the next month and donating it on May 4th or 5th – it adds up fast. The North End Friends of St. Francis House will be having our Annual Flea Market and Bake Sale to support the St. Francis House Homeless Shelter. Drop off your donations at the Nazzaro Center April 30 – May 3!Start your spring cleaning by going through your closets, storage units and cellars and donating your unwanted items. We are accepting household items, records, cds, books, small appliances, collectibles, toys, games, sports equipment, jewelry and similar items that are clean and in good condition for us to sell at our Flea Market. For more information or questions, please contact John Romano at jromano45@gmail.com. All items can be dropped off at the Nazzaro Center starting on Monday April 30th through Thursday May 3rd only! PLEASE NO CLOTHES, COMPUTERS, CAR SEATS, or UNCLEANED ITEMS!last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 Here in the North End were investing in some exc

first_imgHere in the North End, we’re investing in some exciting initiatives and projects that we hope you and your neighbors will enjoy for many years to come.We are investing in shared community spaces around the neighborhood starting with $2.8 million in renovations to the Paul Revere Mall, including improved site furnishings, pathways, landscaping, and utilities, as well as restoration work on the fountain and monument.We are also investing $6.16 million for improvements to Lagone Park and Puopolo Playground, including enhancements to the playground, basketball court, baseball fields, softball field, bocce, lighting, drainage, and plantings. Christopher Columbus Park will also receive a $260,000 investment to improve, including repairs to drainage systems and paved pathways.An investment of $3 million will be put towards the design of the new North End Community Center, ensuring that our centers are updated and serve the community in the best way possible.We know the how important it is to invest in our youngest residents, and I am proud that we have entered the final phase of construction of the Eliot School at 585 Commercial Street as part of our $34.3 million investment. The renovated building will provide additional classrooms supporting the Eliot School’s expansion as a K-8 School.We’re also allocating $2.5 million to invest in the reconstruction of North Square, a project that also includes the installation of public art.Our longer-term investments are intended to lift up our neighborhoods in ways that take into account the needs and wants of the community. With this Capital Plan, we’re preparing our city for the next year, and the years forward.What’s the next step for the Capital Plan? I have submitted the City of Boston’s budget to the Boston City Council, where your City Councilor will review the proposed budget. Once the budget is approved, it will go into effect. This is the budget for fiscal year 2019, meaning the budget will take effect in July 2018, and run throughout the next 12 months.I hope you’ll take a few minutes to look through the budget proposal, online at budget.boston.gov. Together, I look forward to investing in our neighborhoods, and our people. Mayor Walsh presents his proposed Fiscal Year 2019 to Fiscal Year 2023 Imagine Boston Capital Plan (Mayor’s Office Photo by Isabel Leon).By Mayor Martin J. WalshEvery spring, the City of Boston releases our Imagine Boston Capital Plan for the next five years. It outlines where our city’s budget will be focused, our longer-term plans, and our priorities. Essentially, the capital plan details what initiatives and projects in your neighborhood and across the City that we’ll be investing in to make Boston’s future brighter.From the North End, to Mattapan, to Allston-Brighton, to Back Bay, it’s my priority to create growth and opportunity for every Bostonian in every neighborhood. Boston will be at its best when all its residents have the support and opportunity they need to thrive. Investing in initiatives and projects that bring shared growth, success, and greater equity is critical for our city to reach its full potential. Our Capital Plan invests in Boston’s strongest asset: our people. Boston is a city that’s world class because it works for the middle class, and our budget’s priority is to keep supporting the working families that make Boston great.*Advertisement*last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 The historic neon signs from local businesses are

first_imgThe historic neon signs from local businesses are still on display along the Rose Kennedy Greenway. Installed in May 2018, the signs will continue to be illuminated daily from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. through April 2019.Here are two signs photographed by Bob Somerville. The European Restaurant occupied 218 Hanover Street in the North End from 1917 until 1997. The Cycle Center provided affordable bicycles to families in Natick from 1956 to 1997. Take a walk down the Greenway to see all eight signs!“Neighborhood Photo” is a regular feature on NorthEndWaterfront.com. Send in your photos using our Submit a Post form, via email to info@northendwaterfront.com or tag @northend.waterfront on Instagram. Please include a caption or story telling us about your photo.*Advertisement* See past neighborhood photo posts.last_img read more

View Article...

Month: August 2019 True Mothers Address Victory for Vision 2020 Gl

first_imgTrue Mother’s Address Victory for Vision 2020! Global Worship Service for the Accomplishment of Our Mission as New Tribal MessiahsOctober 26, 2014Cheongshim Peace World Center, Korea “Thank you.October is a beautiful time of harvest. Blessed families, members of the Unification Church from around the world, how and what did you harvest today?“Blessing” is a term that humanity and our Heavenly Parent deeply longed for, one that finally appeared after six thousand years. Until the term “blessing” appeared in the fallen world, our Heavenly Parent had to go through indescribable difficulties and True Parents had to carry out the entire providence of restoration through indemnity. Based on their victory, the term “blessing” finally appeared. The blessing… Thank you. However, how are our blessed families today?We have commemorated the second anniversary of True Father’s ascension and are heading toward the third anniversary. At this point, what kind of determination should we make? In his final prayer, as he was leaving us, he asked that we fulfill our responsibilities as tribal messiahs. How seriously have you been putting that into practice in your lives?Today, in two nations, tribal messiahs, who have been carrying out their responsibilities alongside all other members worldwide, have accomplished the restoration of four hundred and thirty families. Today, we have all come together. Let us all congratulate and encourage them. May today become a day of determination for every single one of us to achieve the same objective.I spoke about the blessing. Through the blessing given to fallen humanity, humankind, you have been reborn and received new lives thanks to True Parents. If the fallen world is a polluted and stale world, blessed families are like fresh, clear water. You are like the water of life. What do you think? However, you have responsibilities. Please consider this. Even if you are like clear water, what happens if water remains stagnant? Its quality will deteriorate. Therefore, it must move. It must flow toward the ocean. Livings beings that are dying will revive wherever this true water of life flows. That is why it is necessary for tribal messiahs to act upon their responsibilities.The tribal messiah movement will now become a huge wave and will spread beyond Thailand and the Philippines; it will pass through several countries in Asia and pass through Europe, the Americas, Africa, Oceania and the Middle East. It is swelling and moving toward the ocean. Wherever this wave passes, countless people will be reborn.We cannot rely on anything in the world. The only method is for us to let others know about True Parents. Only when my family, my tribe and my nation become one with True Parents, aligned with the providence, and then they ride on a big wave that spreads to the five oceans and six continents can one world under God, one world—the kingdom of heaven on earth that our Heavenly Parent and humanity longs for—become true. Until that day comes, the day for which humanity has longed, it is my hope that all blessed families, all members of the Unification Church, become one in heart and in body, harmonized in thought and one with True Parents through absolute faith, absolute love and absolute obedience. Can you stand still knowing that our brothers and sisters are still out there, miserable and struggling like orphans? You must stand up. Will you do that?This event is one through which we must unite. We must confidently testify to the world that True Parents have come. You must help people outside our movement become aware of True Parents’ achievements and of how great they are. Do not be afraid. Under the name True Parents, I say that wherever you act and reach out, the spiritual and physical worlds will be with you. What is there to be afraid of then? Confidently cry out. Confidently show the world that you are true blessed families, children of True Parents. Remember that this is the only way you can stand in the ranks of an ancestor of a victorious true family that has guided the seven billion people in becoming citizens of Cheon Il Guk, the status we so longed for. I hope you all become victorious, devoted and loyal sons and daughters.”last_img read more

View Article...